Posts filed under ‘Sambalpur-Chipilima-Hirakud-Huma-Kandhara-Ushakothi’

Hirakud plays host to fewer migratory birds

Following is from the expressbuzz.com:

SAMBALPUR: Call it climate change or impact of industrialisation on the periphery of Hirakud dam reservoir, there has been a drastic reduction in the arrival of migratory birds to the reservoir under Hirakud wildlife division during this winter season.

As winter sets in, migratory birds come down to the reservoir, one of the places for their suitable ensconce. Thousands of birds of various species migrate every year and stay for four months till  February-end before flying back in the first week of March.

The winged guests from far-flung areas including Caspian Sea, Biakal Lake, Aral Sea, Mongolia, Central and South East Asia and Himalayan region flock to the reservoir in the first week of November every year for the winter sojourn. The winged guests stay for about five months at the reservoir which forms the largest artificial lake in Asia with an area of 746 sq km and a shoreline of over 640 km.

Contrary to preceding years, the number of migratory birds descending on the reservoir is almost reduced to half. It is learnt that only a few migratory birds have come down to the reservoir to the dismay of wildlife officers and bird lovers.

As per available reports, over 21,160 migratory birds of about 27 species had flown from far-flung areas to the reservoir as per census in January, 2010. However, their number has come down to 10,722 during the last month census.

As many as 20 to 25 species of birds are seen in the reservoir and common among them are Common Pochard, Red Crested Pochard, Great Duck Bill, Spot Bill (Grey Duck), Great Crested Grebe, Little Grebe, Pond Heron, Painted Stork, Whiskered Tern, Indian River Tern, Gadwall and

Red Wattled Lapwing and Black Winged Stilt.

While the declining number of birds has been a cause of concern for bird lovers, it has become a challenge for the Wildlife Department. Although the cause is yet to be ascertained, it is said to be the result of climate change, massive industrialisation and resultant sound and water pollution.

 

February 13, 2011 at 8:56 am Leave a comment

Hirakud waits for migratory birds

Following is a report by expressbuzz.com:

SAMBALPUR: Unlike previous years, there has been a delay in arrival of migratory birds to the Hirakud dam reservoir (HDR) this winter.

As winter sets in, migratory birds come down to HDR in large numbers.

Thousands of birds of different varieties migrate to this reservoir and stay for four months till February-end before flying back in the first week of March.

The winged guests from far-flung areas including the Caspian Sea, Biakal Lake, the Aral Sea, Mongolia, Central and South East Asia and Himalayan region flock to the reservoir in the first week of November every year for the winter sojourn.

The reservoir is the largest artificial lake in Asia with an area of 746 sq km and a shoreline of over 640 km.

Contrary to the trend in previous years, sufficient number of migratory birds are yet to descend on the reservoir this time.

Only a few migratory birds have come down to the HDR in the third week of this month much to the dismay of wildlife officials and bird lovers.

As per reports, over 21,000 migratory birds of about 27 varieties had flown into HDR last year whereas only a few birds of at least two varieties have reportedly been seen till date during the current year.

Nearly 20-25 species of birds are seen in the reservoir and common among them are Common Pochard, Red Crusted Pochard, Great Duck Bill, Spot Bill (Grey Duck), Great Crested Grebe, Little Grebe, Pond Heron, Painted Stork, Whiskered Tern, Indian River Tern, Gadwall and Red Wattled Lapwing and Black Winged Stilt.

Normally, the winged guests ensconce in Zero Point in Burla, Pitapali, Rampela, Budakanta, Launch Station, Balbaspur in Sambalpur district, Ubuda, Marang, Bhatlikanta, Desar, Ganakhulia, Unneishkhanda Mauza in Jharsuguda and Tamdei Rengali, Govindpur, Barduma in Ambhabhona block of Bargarh district.

On the declining trend, Assistant Conservator of Forest (wildlife) Samir Mitra said the cold is yet to completely set in the region which might be one of the reasons behind the delay.

More and more birds are likely to descend on the reservoir in the next 15 to 20 days, he added.

November 28, 2010 at 6:15 pm Leave a comment

Thousands of migratory birds make Hirakud dam their home

Following is a report from the express buzz.com:

  • Govt. should consider opening a Centre for Ornithology in Sambalpur University. This can be done in collaboration with Department of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University.

As the winter sets in, migratory birds make the Hirakud dam reservoir their temporary abode. Over 50,000 birds of various varieties migrate here every year and stay for four months before flying back in the first week of March.

Much to the delight of wildlife experts and bird lovers, hordes of migratory birds have already descended on the Hirakud reservoir with many more expected soon.

Thousands of migratory birds from far-flung areas including the Caspian Sea, Baikal Lake, Aral Sea, Mongolia, Central and South East Asia and Himalaya region flock to the reservoir in the first week of November every year for winter sojourn. The winged guests stay about five months in the reservoir which forms the largest artificial lake in Asia with an area of 746 sq km and a shoreline of over 640 km.

Nearly 20-25 species of birds are seen in the reservoir and common among them are Common Pochard, Red Crusted Pochard, Great Duck Bill, Spot Bill (Grey Duck), Great Crested Grebe, Little Grebe, Pond Heron, Painted Stork, Whiskered Tern, Indian River Tern, Gadwall, Red Wattled Lapwing and Black Winged Stilt.

They normally settle at Zero Point in Burla, Pitapali, Rampela, Budakanta, Launch Station, Balbaspur in Sambalpur district, Ubuda, Marang, Bhatlikanta, Desar, Ganakhulia, Unneishkhanda Mauza in Jharsuguda and Tamdei Rengali, Govindpur, Barduma in Ambhabhona block of Bargarh district.

However, the declining number of birds arriving at the reservoir and their overstay in the region have raised concern among the bird lovers.

Last year, a good number of birds stayed up till middle of May which is an unlikely behaviour for the birds. While the cause is yet to be ascertained, it is being attributed to climate change. Some experts also opine that safe living conditions and abundance of food may be the reasons behind longer stay.

Usually the arrival of birds is enumerated in January every year. As per reports, at least 56,834 birds of 21 varieties visited the reservoir in January 2005 while the number of birds declined to 49,174 of 26 varieties in January 2006. The number declined further to 36,740 of 18 varieties in January 2007 which went down to 22,443 this year.

Noted environmentalist Artabandhu Mishra said any comment on the number was premature as no study was made by any ornithologist in Hirakud reservoir like that of Chilika to assess the number of birds visiting the reservoir site.

Mishra said availability of food and safe living conditions are the factors that determine visit of migratory birds at a place. “Unfortunately, no one had tried to delve into the subject of finding out when and how the behaviour of migratory birds change. Unlike Chilika, Hirakud does not have ornithologists to study the behaviour of birds,” he added.

December 8, 2009 at 2:55 pm Leave a comment

Tourist centres of Western Odisha

Following are some of the tourist centers of Western Odisha as identified by Odisha govt. This list is obtained from the Orissa Reference Annual-2004. Please have a careful look if some tourist  places of your region are missing. We should compile a complete list of tourist centers of Western Odisha. Then we will appeal to the tourism minister of Odisha and India to declare some of the attractive places  as special tourism zones.

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1. ATHAMALLIK

  • Deulajhari : Hot Spring

2. BALANGIR

  • Balangir : Old city
  • Gaikhai M.I.P. : Scenic Spot
  • Harishankar : Religious Center
  • Jogisarada : Religious Center
  • Patnagarh : Religious Center
  • Ranipur Jharial : Chausathi Yogini temple
  • Saintala : Religious Center
  • Turekela : Scenic Spot

3. BARAGARH

  • Baragarh : Sambalpuri Hand- looms
  • Debrigarh : Wildlife
  • Devdarha : Scenic Spot
  • Gaisima : Religious Center
  • Ganiapali : Historical Site
  • Nrusinghanath : Religious Center
  • Papanga : Scenic Spot

4. BOUDH

  • Boudh : Buddhist Shrine
  • Charichhak, Puruna Katak : Strategic Point, Religious place
  • Charisambhu : Religious Center

5. DEOGARH

  • Pradhanpat : Waterfall

6. JHARSUGUDA

  • Gujapahar : Scenic Spot
  • Jharsuguda : District Headquarter
  • Kuilighugar : Scenic Spot
  • Pikalghugar : Scenic Spot
  • Vikramkhol : Pictograpic Inscriptions

7. KALAHANDI

  • Amathagarh : Fort
  • Ampani : Scenic Spot
  • Asurgarh : Historical Site
  • Belkhandi : Religious Center
  • Bhawanipatna : District Headquarter, Old city
  • Dharmagarh : Historical Site
  • Gudahandi (Dokrichanchara) : Pictograpic Inscriptions
  • Jakam : Scenic Spot
  • Junagarh : Historical Site
  • Karlapat : Wildlife
  • Kusurla : Religious Center
  • Mardiguda : Scenic Spot
  • Phurlijharan : Waterfall
  • Rabandarh : Scenic Spot
  • Sapagaranda : Religious Center
  • Talguda : Fort
  • Thuamul-Rampur : Scenic Spot

8. NUAPADA

  • Budhikomna : Religious Center
  • Nuapada : District Headquarter, Old city
  • Patalaganga : Religious Center
  • Patora : Scenic Spot
  • Sindursil : Scenic Spot
  • Thipakhol : Scenic Spot
  • Yogimatha : Cave Paintings

9. SAMBALPUR

  • Chipilima Religious Center
  • Gudguda Scenic Spot
  • Hirakud Scenic Spot
  • Huma : Religious Center, Leaning Temple
  • Kandhar : Birth Place of Bhima Bhoi
  • Sambalpur : Sambalpuri Hand-looms
  • Ushakothi (Badarama) : Wildlife

10. SUBARNAPUR

  • Binika (Papakshya Ghat) : Religious Center
  • Chandalipat Puja Dunguri : Religious Center
  • Charada : Historical Site
  • Khaliapali : Mahima Shrine
  • Kotsamlai (Patali Jagannath Pitha) : Religious Center
  • Sonepur : Temple Town

11. SUNDERGARH

  • Chhatri : Hill Scenic Spot
  • Darjeeng : Scenic Spot
  • Deodaraha : Scenic Spot
  • Ghogar : Religious Center
  • Junagarh : Fort
  • Khandadhar : Waterfall
  • Mandira : Scenic Spot
  • Miriglotah : Waterfall
  • Rourkela : Steel Plant
  • Sundergarh : District Headquarter
  • Ushakothi : Scenic Spot
  • Vedavyasa : Religious Center

__________________________________________________________________________________________

  • If you have any pictures of these places please do send me at sanjibkarmee@gmail.com

November 14, 2009 at 1:57 pm 6 comments

Boating at Hirakud soon

Following is a report from The Times of India:

The state government is planning to develop a new tourism circuit in western Orissa by giving a fillip to different sites of tourist interests in Sambalpur, Bargarh, Jharsuguda, Deogarh and Sundargarh districts, tourism and culture minister Debi Prasad Mishra said here on Monday. Among the new plans, boating facilities would be introduced at Hirakud dam.

Mishra said stress would be on improving the infrastructure and other requirements at various historic sites, well-sculpted temples, water reservoirs and waterfalls to attract more domestic and foreign tourists. Besides, rural tourism in western parts of the state would also be promoted, he added.

According to an official release, such places of tourist interest like Chiplima, Humma, Gujuda, Hirakud and Ushakothi in Sambalpur district; Debrigarh, Nrusinghanath, Ganiapalli, Gaeseema, Barpali, Chikidi and Debadhar in Bargarh district; Pradhankhot and Kailash in Deogarh district; Gujapahar, Kueligharur, Pikhalgharur and Bikramkhol in Jharsuguda district; Chatri Parbat, Darjing, Deodhar, Junagarh, Goghar, Mandira, Khandadhar and Veda Vyas in Sundargarh district, among others, would be expeditiously developed. Besides, Harishankar Pith, Jogisarada, Ranipur-Jharial, Saintala and Tureikela in Balangir district would also be developed.

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October 24, 2009 at 12:55 pm Leave a comment

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