Posts filed under ‘Existing Universities and Institutes’

Without adequate infrastructure Odisha government plans to increase 300 MBBS seats

There are no adequate infrastructures to sustain the present MBBS students and faculty. In this circumstances such statement is like day-dreaming or the govt. is fooling the people. 

Following report is from TOI:

BHUBANESWAR: The state government is planning to increase the number of undergraduate seats in all three government medical colleges to 250 each, the highest possible intake for any college under the Medical Council of India (MCI) norms. However, the government has been struggling hard to meet the standard set for the existing capacity of 150 students in these colleges.

Working on the principle that raising the capacity in the colleges instead of establishing new ones will save costs, the government has been pushing for the maximum seat possibiity. There are just 10 medical colleges across India with such peak ability.

“The government will approach MCI to consider 100 more seats for Cuttack in 2013. A year later in 2014, it will plead for similar hike in VSS Medical College and Hospital Burla and MKCG Medical College and Hospital Berhampur,” said Dr P K Das, director medical education and training (DMET).

Dr Das said the Cuttack hospital is almost ready for the increase in seats, while efforts are on to match the requirement in the two other colleges. The government will create additional lecture theatres, increase hostel capacity, create one auditorium of 650-capacity each and upgrade laboratories and libraries in these colleges. The state has to increase the bed strength in Burla and Berhampur hospitals to at least 1,190 as per MCI norms for 250 MBBS seats from the current 800 and 1,081 beds respectively. The Cuttack hospital has a bed strength of 1,600, which exceeds the minimum bed requirement criteria for 250 seats.

Dr Das said after infrastructure upgradation, there should not be any big huddles in increasing the number of seats. “We don’t have to worry much about faculties, except for filling up existing vacancies as the sanctioned strength is not far short of meeting the criteria for the proposed expansion. The government is taking steps to fill up the vacancies on a priority basis,” the DMET said.

If new medical colleges are established for 300 seats, the government will incur a cost of Rs 1,100 crore. But by spending Rs 450 crore on upgradation of infrastructure in existing colleges, the government can produce 300 more doctors every year at a 40% cost, said a senior officer of the DMET.

Notably, the government increased MBBS seats in SCB Medical College from 107 to 150 in 2006 and made similar increase in VSS and MKCG after a year in 2007. The MCI last year gave its final recognition for the increased capacity in SCB Medical College. However, it is yet to give its permanent recognition to the two other colleges. Though MCI inspection for permanent recognition in these two colleges is due in February-March, the government is still struggling to fill up largescale vacancies in the two institutions.

In Burla, around 60 of the sanctioned 163 posts in clinical disciplines are lying unoccupied, while over 20 of the 79 non-clinical posts are vacant. “We have written to the government to fill up these vacancies before the MCI inspection,” said Dr Santosh K Behera, principal of VSS Medical College. Similar largescale vacancies mar the MKCG Medical College and Hospital as well, sources said.

“We have around 50 vacancies of faculty members because base level posts of assistant professors could not be filled up for long. Now, the process has started again. We will shortly fill these vacancies,” said Dr Sunamali Bag, principal of MKCG Medical College. Hopefully by another year, the infrastructure for the proposed expansion too will be ready, he added.

January 9, 2012 at 7:18 pm 2 comments

Utkal University to introduce BTech programmes

It was very sad that a bunch of fools from western Odisha were opposing the then VC of Sambalpur University Prof AK Pujari while he was trying to introduce UG cources in Jyoti Vihar. The so called activist-fools are not aware of the fact that all most all successful institutes in the world (from IIT to MIT) have UG courses in their campuses. Universities are not merely for PG and PhD courses. A bunch of fools in western Odisha are hurting the growth of the region.

See the following is a report from The Telegraph:

Bhubaneswar, Dec. 14: TheUtkalUniversity is planning to introduce BTech programmes in nanotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence in its proposed engineering college.

There will be 30 seats for each discipline. The decision was taken at the syndicate meeting that chalked out an action plan for establishing “the centre of science and technology” within a year, under which all the new courses will run.

A committee, led by professor Trilochan Pradhan, has been assigned to conduct a “feasibility study” for the courses. The committee will also prepare a project report, including infrastructure and faculty requirement.

“Instead of the traditional branches of engineering such as mechanical, civil and electrical, the university will begin with cutting-edge technologies such as BTech in nanotechnology, BTech in robotics and artificial intelligence under its upcoming engineering college,” a senior official of the university said.

“Over 25,000 seats are lying vacant in engineering colleges across the state. But seats are not going vacant at the Indian Institute of Technology or the National Institute of Technology. It’s high time we cash on the brand of the university. All the courses will be offered at affordable fees as emphasis will be given on maintaining quality and not earning profits,” he said.

Senior faculty from the departments of knowledge engineering, physics, and chemistry will be initially engaged for the courses. The university is also exploring possible tie-ups with other premier technical institutes to pull in the best experts for its new school.

“A centre for science and technology will be opened and all the BTech disciplines will be brought under its fold. Since the construction of the centre will take time, we plan to make use of the space at the department of pharmacy and start the courses by the next academic session,” the official said.

Discussions were also held on launching of courses of food technology and agri-management. The university vice chancellor had, earlier this month, announced the launching of an engineering college on the varsity campus.

While aiming for introduction of more courses, the idea behind launching these courses was to generate funds for maintenance of the university, he said.

December 15, 2011 at 3:56 pm 1 comment

Xavier’s Institute of Management (XIMB) plans for a University at Sambalpur

Following is a report from the http://www.pagalguy.com:

Bhubhaneswar-based Xavier’s Institute of Management (XIMB) is in the process of turning into a university soon, its Director Fr PT Joseph, SJ tells PaGaLGuY. In this interview, he also speaks about the curriculum changes the institute is planning for its Post Graduate Diploma in Management (PGDM) and the PGDM Rural Management courses.

What changes can the incoming batch of 2013 look forward to benefitting from at XIMB?

From the point of view of the fulltime programme students, we will be revising the curriculum a little bit next year. Apart from that, although it doesn’t directly affect PGDM or PGDM(RM) students, but we have started a 1-year advanced management programme on Resettlement and Rehabilitation and Corporate Social Responsibility for 15 executives of Uttarakhand’s Tehri Hydro Development Corporation. This along with our other initiatives in the rural management and social sector will continue to be under focus in the coming year.

Are you looking at an increase in intake for any of the the two-year programmes?

We were looking at expansion in the number of seats but the proposal hasn’t gone past AICTE’s regulations. But we may become a university soon and therefore increase intake from a university perspective. That process might take one or two months to finalize, but we are in the process of becoming a university.

Would that mean that the PGDM degrees would be offered as full-fledged MBA degrees under the XIMB University?

The PGDM will still remain as an AICTE-approved course, it may not become a university degree for now. But after we get university status we may start some other type of programmes under the university. Right now we have gotten the government sanction of Rs 10 crores and are involved with acquiring the necessary land for the University in Sambalpur. Until land is acquired, which is priority for now, we aren’t in a position to share more details.

What is XIMB’s faculty strength now and how are you thinking about expanding it?

As of now we are 55 in total. One more is joining in December and another two may join in January 2011. We hire faculty whenever we come across somebody good. For example, one of the faculty joining next is a Cornell University PhD with lots of experience. Another person in the recruitment process has worked in Netherlands and has a PhD from Korea.

What kind of curriculum changes are you going to make in the PGDM and PGDM(RM) courses before the next batch joins?

We have already started a new course on Environment and Sustainability which is mandatory for all the 180 PGDM students. There’s another mandatory course on Emotional quotient and Leadership. Next, we are planning a meeting of all the faculty on the January 12, 2011. Before that meeting, a committee is preparing the background papers by looking at changes in the global and Indian economy. Only after the January 12 meeting will a clear picture emerge about the exact changes.

But speaking in general, we’ve been teaching management that is too bifurcated by specialization in our view. As you know, students choose to go for either marketing or finance or other specializations during the course. We are having a feeling that there should be some integration between these specializations by changing their content and give each course a holistic approach. For example, we know that there is a good market for inkjet printer cartridges. But inkjet cartridge production also generates a large amount of waste and affects the environment. So when we teach either of marketing or production management, we need to also bring awareness of sustainability in and show how both marketing and production are linked. If we can do this, we will not only make better managers but also better human beings. Apart from that, we would like to increase our connection with the bottom of the pyramid. We have a very strong programme in which all 180 PGDM students went and stayed in villages for 3 days. We want to increase their exposure to bottom of the pyramid and to leadership. We would also like to focus on ways to increase mentoring from faculty and senior students.

What are your thoughts on b-schools changing their admission policy to reduce the number of engineers in the batch?

This is something we tried to do last year already. We wanted to bring down the number of engineers and increase the batch diversity by taking in students from other backgrounds. But unfortunately all the students who are getting good grades in XAT were engineers and we could not reduce their number last year. But we’ll continue to give quantitative ability lesser weightage compared to verbal and commnication skills and try to reduce the number of engineers.

Looking at the Indian scenario, I would prefer 60% engineers and 40% non-engineers ideally in the XIMB batches. The job market requirements are still such that the engineering background is preferred so we cant reduce it too much.

We have traditionally seen what an engineer-driven MBA job market looks like. But in your view what scope do non-engineers with an MBA degree have in the market?

Only the product marketing, production and manufacturing companies need people to necessarily have engineering backgrounds. But the remaining type of jobs, that is finance, human resources, some types of marketing and market research, advertising are areas that do not really require engineers.

January 2, 2011 at 11:04 am Leave a comment

Year-old VSSUT eyes status of Innovative University: The Pioneer

Following is a report from The Pioneer:

The Vir Surendra Sai University of Technology (VSSUT) formed by up-gradation of the University College of Engineering (UCE) at Burla completed a year this month with Prof Deba Kumar Tripathy as the first Vice-Chancellor.

“It (VSSUT) has made record achievements during this short span. It also plans to go ahead and reach the peak to see itself at par with all other developed technical institutions of the country and abroad,” said Prof Tripathy at a media conference in the university campus.

The V-C said the university, being entrusted by the Department of Industries, conducted the Joint Entrance Examination (JEE) 2010 this year very successfully for students’ admission into medical, engineering and many other technical courses through e-counselling. Formation of a finance committee and a board of management, filling up of the vacancies in teaching posts and appointment of deans, Registrar and Controller of Finance are the other achievements, he said.

The university also held its first convocation for the pass-out batch of students for the year 2009. “Smooth conduct of different examinations and publication of results in one month’s time is nothing but a record in the State,” Prof Tripathy claimed. As many as 305 students have been recruited in various reputed institutions and industries during 2009-10 through campus interviews, he pointed out.

The V-C further said the university has introduced new programmes like Electrical and Electronics Engineering, MTech in Computational Math and MSc in Applied Physics and Industrial Chemistry. It has also enhanced the intake capacity to various programmes keeping in view the growing demands from students.

Prof Tripathy informed that the State Government has sought a proposal from the VSSUT for converting it into an Innovative University. The Centre Government wants to convert 20 technical institutions in the country into such universities. The VSSUT can stake its claim for this as it fulfils most of the criteria.

“The Centre Government will spend `4,600 crore to upgrade 20 institutions to Innovative Universities,” the V-C further informed. Instead of establishing new universities, the Government will rather improve the old ones, he added.

September 20, 2010 at 6:54 pm Leave a comment

Stiff opposition for Sambalpur University’s ‘private exam’ move

Following is a report from expressbuzz.com

SAMBALPUR: The privatisation and outsourcing spree has not spared Sambalpur University either. If the varsity authorities have their way, students will soon find their examination and evaluation done by a private agency. And this has stirred up a hornet’s nest.  The student community and the intelligentsia expressed strong resentment at the move to outsource examination.

The university is planning Integrated Examination Management System under which a private agency will be hired. The agency will look after all the exam-related activities __ registration of examinees, admit cards, setting question papers, valuation of answersheets and issuing provisional marksheets. The system is to be implemented at the university’s 220-affiliated colleges, besides various departments.  Once implemented, this would effectively end the work of six examination cells, six confidential cells, one private cell and one distance education cell that are involved in conducting examinations of around 65,000 students every year. 

Sources said three south-based IT firms __ Mind Largx Infotech Limited (Bangalore), Merit Trac Services Private Limited (Bangalore) and Om Shanti Soft Solution Private Limited (Hyderabad) had evinced interest in the project after the varsity floated a tender in July.  Although university authorities have not yet finalised the deal, the move has led to public outcry. Former Vice-Chancellor of Berhampur University Prof A P Padhi and All-India University Employees’ Federation president Bhawani Hota have asked the authorities to first evolve a consensus.  University syndicate member Karunakar Supakar said he would raise the issue at the syndicate. 

The decision has also come in for stiff opposition from Sambalpur University Employees’ Association, All-Koshal Students’ Union, Sambalpur Chhatra Vikash Parishad and Sambalpur unit of NSUI.  The NSUI, led by district president Debasis Dash, held a meeting on Saturday and resolved to launch a stir if the decision is not withdrawn. However, university Registrar Dr S S Rath said the proposal is at nascent stage and all aspects will be looked into before taking a final decision.

This report was filed by Mr. Ratan K Pani

August 13, 2010 at 8:33 am 15 comments

State universities of India need to have greater freedom: Kapil Sibal

Following is a report from http://economictimes.indiatimes.com:

How will innovation universities change higher education?

We have not adopted a top-down approach, ours is a bottom-up one. So far we have spoken of inclusive agenda of development, we are now thinking in terms of an inclusive education agenda. The idea is to empower institutions at the base of the pyramid. State universities are the foundation of higher education segment. State universities need to have greater freedom so confirm to realities of 21st century. The Centre is willing to give a helping hand.

Is that all required to improve institutions?

There is proposal to help state universities, which make up bulk of higher education segment. The Centre can help by giving more funds to strengthen these universities. This would help build infrastructure and quality. But state governments need to step up and provide policy framework. This framework will give universities more freedom. UGC can make grants beyond what it already does. But state governments must allow for more freedom so that state universities can transform themselves.

Are state only expected to provide for a more liberal policy framework?

Over the years, the Centre’s share of expenditure in public education has increased, while states’ share has come down. This mismatch should be corrected.

Many institutions suggest quality can be improved with freedom in admissions policy…

There should be democracy. An institution should have the right to decide on what basis it wants to admit students. At the same time there should not be unnecessary pressure on students. So some institutes can decide to admit on the basis of Class XII results — on the basis of merit. While other institutes could admit on the basis of the national aptitude test, or look at the aptitude test as an add on. There is also the option of add on subject tests. So the class XII results determine subject knowledge, aptitude tests will assess raw intelligence, and add on tests will assess special knowledge.

So each institute can determine the basis on which they admit, rather than doing so through individual entrance tests. The idea is to reduce tests, while still giving each institute the freedom to admit students that fit in with the specific focus of the institute. Let me give an example, what is the difference between Yale and Harvard law Schools. Yale is focused on research while Harvard is more business minded, so corporate law is a focus. So in their admissions policy they would show a preference for those who fit in to their respective focus areas.

Will this make the education system more inclusive?

Right now we have entrance exams to exclude students, to keep some people out. I want to reduce stress for students, but also exclude exclusion. If we were a more mature system, I would say that interviews would be the final basis of deciding who gets admitted and who doesn’t. But we are not mature enough. Allowing for discretion would not help. So I want to put in place a system that doesn’t give space for discretion.

July 27, 2010 at 5:31 pm Leave a comment

23rd convocation of Sambalpur University

Following is a report from Odia daily The Samaj:

July 18, 2010 at 3:47 pm Leave a comment

Why Orissa as a state can’t develop?; A report from merinews

Following report is taken from merinews:

The Government of India’s National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) in a report has released the well-being index of India. The same tell about the quality of life in India. This report has mentioned that six districts of Orissa being in the list of worst twenty districts of India. Rayagada district ranks the worst in India followed by Kandhamal, Nuapada, Bolangir, Koraput and Bargarh, all in Western and Southern part of the state, are ranked at 4,9,10 & 19 from the bottom respectively.
It has been many years since the Government. of India has been pumping thousands of Crores as special budget for the welfare of these districts of Western and Southern Orissa through scheme like KBK. Then how is it that after so many years of huge money inflow into these districts there is no change in statistics? Who is accountable for this mishap? Is the Chief functionary of the state not responsible for this?”
Orissa, one of the poorest of states in the Indian union, is inhabited by more than 24% of tribal population concentrated mostly in North-Western, Western and Southern part of the state. Due to the negligence of all successive state governments, the development of these three patches are far behind the Coastal Orissa tract by any parameter even though these regions are full of minerals and natural resources.
In two occasions, during 1936 and 1948, these tribal dominated Western and Southern regions amalgamated into then Orissa division (precisely the present Coastal Orissa) from erstwhile Central and Madras presidency of British ruled India respectively to form Orissa state in the line of linguistic similarities. But, reality is, till now the native people residing in these regions don’t know how to speak the state official language Odiya, which is practiced in Coastal Orissa districts in particular. Vast region of Western Orissa communicate in variants of Sambalpuri language (also termed as Kosli by some) and with numerous tribal languages practiced by the indigenous tribal population. This leads to poor enrolment in school which encourages Odiya as the medium of education and thus a high school dropout rate is seen in these regions. Students are forced to learn Odiya language in school which is different than what they practice in day to day life.
The differentiation between the then Orissa Division (Coastal Orissa) and the newly added Western and Southern regions is well maintained by all successive state Governments, while allocating funds and in developmental works.
Inhabited by app.50% of the state population (17,899,735 as per 2001 Census) and spread in 28.73% of total land of the state (44,355.4 Sq Km), this Coastal Orissa tract is given utmost priority by all the successive state governments and have been enjoying all sorts of developmental works in the name of Orissa. Where as a vast land with more than 71.27% of the total land area of Orissa state (109,992 Sq Km), and with a population of little above half of the state population is depriving basic needs.
It is pity that present state government too, has done nothing to minimize the gap between the coastal and the rest of Orissa in its decade long rule; but increasing it by concentrating every developmental activity in and around the state capital Bhubaneswar. During this government’s tenure, all the national institutes for higher studies and research sanctioned by the central government are established or proposed to establish in and around Bhubaneswar. Due to this capital centric attitude, common masses refer the Chief Minister Nabin Pattnaik as the Mayor of Bhubaneswar Municipal Corporation than the CM of the state.
In recent development except for the Central University, all the educational and research institutes of national repute, such as Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), All India Institute of Medical Science (AIIMS), National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER), Indian Institute of Information Technology (IIIT), etc awarded by Central Government for the entire state are located in and around Bhubaneswar. This has brought a distinction for Bhubaneswar as the only city in India to have an IIT, AIIMS and NISER at one location.
Central Government has also proposed to establish a National Innovative University (World Class), National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT), ESI Medical College and Hospital, Railway Medical College in Bhubaneswar, and another IIIT in Berhampur in Coastl Orissa, neglecting the rest state.
Existing and proposed Central funded National Institutes and Universities in Orissa:
Rest Orissa Coastal Orissa
1. NIT, Rourkela, Dist. Sundargarh 1. IIT, Bhubaneswar
2. Central University, Koraput 2. IIT – Kharagpur, Bhubaneswar Branch
3. Indian Institute of Handloom Technology, (IIHT), Bargarh 3. National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER), Bhubanneswar
4. Food Craft Institute, Balangir 4. AIIMS like Institute, Bhubaneswar
5. IIIT, Bhubaneswar
6. National University, Bhubaneswar (proposed)
7. IIIT, Berhampur (Work on progess)
8. Indian Institute of Tourism & Travel Management (IITTM), Bubaneswar
9. Institute of Minerals and Material Technology, Bhubaneswar
10. Indian Institute of Mass Communications,(IIMC), Dhenkanal
11. Central Rice Research Institute, Cuttack
12. Biju Pattanaik National Steel Institute (BPNSI), Puri
13. Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET), Bhubaneswar
14. Eastern Regional Language Centre for CILL, Bhubaneswar
15. Institute of Life Sciences, Bhubaneswar
16. Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar
17. Regional Medical Research Centre, (RMRC), Bhubaneswar
18. Central Fisheries Institute, Kousalyaganga, Bhubaneswar
19. Regional Research Laboratory,Bhubaneswar
20. National Research Centre for Women in Agriculture (NRCWA), Bhubaneswar
21. Ocean Science and Technology Cell (OSTC), Berhampur
22. National Institute of Rehabilitation Training and Research (NIRTAR), Cuttack
23. National Institute of Design (NID), Bhubaneswar (Proposed)
24. NIFT, Bhubaneswar (Proposed)
If you consider the allotment of health facilities in the state the picture of disparities done towards the rest of the tribal regions of the state gets crystal clear. There is just one state run Medical College, viz, VSS Medical College & Hospital, Burla in Sambalpur for the entire Western Orissa, there are state run SCB Medical college in twin cities of Bhubaneswar – Cuttack , MKCG Medical College in Berhampur, a city just 179 Km from Bhubaneswar by Road and 165 Km by train.
Mahandi Coal Field Ltd. (MCL), a subsidiary of Coal India Ltd, a Central Government entity which has operation in Western as well as Central Orissa, is too establishing a Medical College Hospital in Talcher Town, 150 Km from state Capital Bhubaneswar, with state government’s active persuasion. The defense dept has proposed to set up a medical college in Baleswar, another town in Coastal Orissa with a distance of 198 Km by Road from Bhubaneswar.
State government has recently proposed to upgrade Capital Hospital in Bhubaneswar to a Medical College with a hoping budget of 32.5 Crores. It is also been proposed to set up Government. Medical College & Hospital in Baleswar where as the state government is trying to establish 3 Private Medical Colleges in backward tribal dominated Western Orissa in PPP mode since last 15 years through Western Orissa Development Council (WODC) with a financial grant of 5 Crores each. There is no progress seen in establishing these Medical colleges in these backward regions of Orissa.
So, a question instantly arises in mind, “Why private Medical College & Hospital for poor tribal region of Western Orissa, who can’t afford a full meal a day and central and state funded Government. Medical Colleges & Hospitals for Coastal Orissa?” Is this not pure discrimination?
Central and State sponsored Medical Institutions in Orissa
Rest Orissa Coastal Orissa
1. VSS Medical College, Burla, Sambalpur 1. SCB Medical college, Cuttack
2. Medical College under Central University, Koraput 2. SCB Dental College, Cuttack
3. MKCG Medical College, Berhampur
4. Capital Medical College, Bhubaneswar
5. AIIMS, Bhubaneswar (Proposed)
6.ESI Medical College and Hospital, Bhubaneswar (Proposed)
7. Medical College under National Innovative University, Bhubaneswar (Proposed)
8. ECO Railway Medical College, Bhubaneswar (Proposed)
9. Medical College by MCL, Talcher, a subsidiary of Coal India Ltd
10. Medical College, Balasore (Proposed by State Government.)
11. Medical College, Balasore (proposed by Defence dept)
Points to notice that Balangir, Kalahandi, in this back ward Western Orissa, many times have created news in national media for starvation deaths. Low-income people in these backward districts can hardly afford the cost of good health care even for their children who suffer from early death, under nutrition and anemia. As against the State figure of 65 infant deaths per 1000 life births, district like Kalahandi in the Western Orissa had 119 infant deaths.
Prevalence of undernourishment among children is also high in these tribal dominating districts. The health situation is really gloomy if we look at maternal death rates. Women in these households work hard at home, in the fields, bear children and do not get the medical attention while giving birth to children.
Occurrence of malaria remains a threat to the people in the tribal areas. As many as 158 blocks in tribal districts, which contribute 70 per cent of the malarial cases, suffer the worst. Sometimes outbreak of mysterious diseases in these regions takes a heavy toll of life. Poverty and deprivation leave very little money with people to spend on the treatment of diseases and illness.
The state government is earning maximum revenue from these under developed tribal belts through mining and industries. When the industries are exploiting and polluting the region, are opening health care units and educational facilities in Coastal Orissa with state government’s active persuasion. The recent Vedanta group promoted World Class University in Puri- Konark Road with a budget of 15,000 Cr and in an area of 6,000 Acre sets the perfect example. Vedanta Industries Ltd has established two Aluminum plants in Western Orissa, the refinery unit and captive power plant at Lanjigarh in Kalahandi District and smelter plant with captive power plant at Jharsuguda, where as it is opening its 100 bed capacity burn and trauma care unit in Bhubaneswar, which i
s at a distance of 400 Km from Jharsuguda and more than 450 Km from Lanjigarh.

Hundreds of crores rupees received from central government in the name of KBK has become a source of exploitation for the state government. The head quarter of the KBK scheme is at the state capital Bhubaneswar, far away from the problems people are facing in their every day life. This century of exploitation by all successive state government since the formation of the state in 1936, towards these tribal pockets has forced them to shout for a separate state of Kosal comprising 11 districts and a sub-division of Western Orissa. Also, the Maoist guerillas are spreading in rest tribal districts in rapid speed taking advantage of this.

These entire exploitation stories remind the colonial era and raise some fundamental questions about democratic rights in India.

July 15, 2010 at 2:36 pm 2 comments

Xavier Institute of Management Bhubaneswar (XIMB) to open centres in Balangir and Sambalpur

Following is a report from The Pioneer:

The Xavier Institute of Management Bhubaneswar (XIMB) is expanding and will open two centres in Balangir and Sambalpur in western Odisha to provide higher education in Management.

Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik has not only green-signalled the expansion project but has extended financial support for developing infrastructure for the new institutions. Both for the Balangir and Sambalpur centres, the State Government would provide a grant of Rs 20 crore from the kitty of the Western Odisha Development Council, said sources.

The proposal was sent to the CM by Minister Planning & Coordination and Public Enterprises AU Singh Deo. Singh Deo has pointed out that this part of the State does not have good educational institutions. So, opening branches of XIMB would fulfil this, he said.

The CM has favoured the idea and approved the proposal, said a senior officer in the Department of Planning & Coordination. Chief Secretary TK Mishra has also sided with the idea of supporting the XIMB for opening its branches.

The XIMB, engaged in developmental activities in Balangir district, has planned to start a programme on Rural Management with 60 students and General Management with specialisation in Banking and Financial Services with a similar capacity. XIMB Director Fr PT Joseph, SJ, has forwarded the proposal to the Department of Planning & Coordination for consideration.

July 7, 2010 at 8:41 pm 1 comment

Prof. Arun Kumar Pujari’s vision on Sambalpur University and Sambalpur University Institute of Information Technology (SUIIT)

Following report is from Dharitri: 

May 21, 2010 at 5:26 pm 2 comments

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