Posts filed under ‘Kalahandi’

Survey finds health care in trauma in Kalahandi and Balangir districts

Following is a report from the Telegraph

Bhubaneswar, Aug. 12: Another case of dengue death was today reported from the SCB Medical College and Hospital in Cuttack, while swine flu has already claimed nine lives in the state this year.

When the state is facing multiple health issues, a Bhubaneswar-based organisation, the Centre for Youth and Social Development (CYSD), has conducted a survey on the issue and challenges of primary heath care facilities in the two most backward districts – Kalahanadi and Balangir. The survey reveals how people are still not getting basic health services, including ambulance services.

The study was conducted in Balangir and Patnagarth constituencies of Balangir district and Narla and Junagarh constituencies of Kalahanadi district. The infamous Daana Majhi case that was reported last year, where Daana had to carry the body of his wife for nearly 12 kilometres after being unable to get the ambulance, was reported from Kalahandi district. In these four constituencies, a total of 37 primary health care centres have been selected by the organisation. The study covered primary health care centre, sub centres, villages and communities in these areas.

The expert team interviews 50 per cent of out patient department (OPD) patients visiting each PHC. The patients were selected on the basis of convenience and snowball sampling method. They were asked to share their satisfaction levels and experience at the primary health care centres. Total 370 patients (10 patients from each primary health care centres) were covered. Besides, the grassroots services providers – Accredited Social health Activists (Asha), auxiliary nurse midwives and anganwadi workers were interviewed on implementation of various government schemes.

They find unavailability of buildings as a major problem in imparting health care service to the patients. In absence of adequate and habitable staff quarters, it won’t be possible to put a check on doctor absenteeism and 24X7 primary health care centres won’t function smoothly. The primary health care centres need to be converted into 24X7 centres with in-patient department facilities.

Provision of safe drinking water and power back up (important in case of power failure during emergencies) are also major issues at the primary health care centres. The unavailability of diagnostic services and referral transport is causing a lot of difficulties for the people. While in some instances people are bound to pay higher prices in getting their medical condition resolved, in other cases, many are often showing lack of interest due to lack of money (thus, turning again to traditional healing methods or quacks).

The service providers also showed displeasure in many aspects. The doctors showed discontent regarding unavailability of staff quarters leading to daily commuting to the primary health care centres (few of them which are in remote areas).

Though medicines never run out of the stock and the quality of the medicine is good, the people don’t trust the quality of medicines as they think that government medicines are free and therefore, might be of poor quality. In many cases, doctors allegedly prescribe expensive medicines that patient parties have to buy from outside.

Asha and auxiliary nurse midwives are the health activists in the community who create awareness on health and its social determinants and mobilise the community towards local health planning and increase utilisaton and accountability of the existing health services. But these service providers face various issues at the ground level, such as communication problem, excessive field area and too much workload.

The survey report also alleges that the Asha workers are losing interest and motivation to carry out their regular duties as they are not getting incentives at the right time. Some of them also remained absent on the MAMATA Divas which is held on the second Friday of every month. Due to this continuous absenteeism, the beneficiaries have started losing trust on Asha workers.

Another major issue is lack of ambulance facilities and the people depend on their own bikes and bicycle, to reach to hospitals. Lack of ambulance facilities often turn out to be fatal for pregnant women. The status of 102 and 108 ambulance services is in highly deteriorated condition and people have been grossly disappointed.

CYSD co-founder Jagadananad said: “The study is an attempt to understand the nuances of the primary health care services provided at the grassroots and to gather the perceptions of the community regarding the services like access to health, infrastructure, human resources.”

Delivery in auto-rickshaw

A woman of Sunakhandi Tikarpada village in Kalyansighpur block of Rayagada district delivered a baby in an auto-rickshaw on her way to the hospital on Saturday. Her family members alleged that though they called the 102 ambulance service to rush her to Kalyansinghpur Community Health Centre after she complained of labour pain, the ambulance did not turn up.

August 16, 2017 at 7:20 pm Leave a comment

How a 75-year-old tribal man grew a forest in Kalahandi

Debabrata Mohanty
Hindustan Times, Bhubaneswar
Forest officials say the work by Majhi and local tribals in Kalahandi is an important step in guarding the forest resources.

The septuagenarian Kondh tribal from Kalahandi’s Boringpadar village may not have studied much, but has brought cheer and hope to a place where death is an annual feature.

In 1979, Majhi started planting sapling on the 97 acre barren land adjoining a hillock near his village with support from the Nehru Yuva Kendra. Villagers who used to grow millet on that land had no idea what Majhi was up to, but grudgingly came around to support him for next three years.

Some 35 years later, the 97 acres of once-barren land near his village is home to a luxuriant forest consisting of Sal, Teak, Acacia, Chakunda and several other timber and fruit-bearing trees. In the process, he showed the ability of free Indians to battle the most adverse of circumstances, and the transformation that takes place when society and state collaborate.

Epicentre of starvation

Kalahandi in the 60s was known as Ethiopia of India for its acute starvation triggered by long periods of drought. After a particularly protracted spell of drought in 70s and 80s that forced poor parents to sell their children, former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi visited the region. While its forested landscape was being slowly eroded by timber smugglers who valued the rich Kalahandi teak, the shifting cultivation of tribals took its toll on the forest cover

“When I was young I came to realise that without rains we would not have any hope. My father told me that the only way we can have regular rains is through forests,” said Majhi. This was the time when a young Majhi got serious about ways to prevent drought.

An old picture showing Manjhi and others planting saplings (HT photo)

 

With some handholding by local forest officials and help from Nehru Yuva Kendra in Bhawanipatna, Majhi and his elder brother Bali through Boringpadar Yuvak Sangha started planting saplings on the barren land, that was recorded as forest in government files. Soon the rest of the villagers joined in. The remunerations were not great – all that the villagers got was a sack of potatoes and two sacks of rice.

“At times when people were not willing to go for planting, I used to mortgage my umbrella and utensils at home to pay people and a security guard to keep an eye on the saplings,” said Majhi, standing next to a sal tree which he planted. Tejiraj Pradhan, a young farmer, still remembers how he used to plant saplings with Kartik mausa.

The transformation

Ten years later as the saplings grew in length, the once-barren area sported a different look. “It was like seeing a desert bloom,” said Majhi’s friend Kirtan Majhi.

Impressed with his work in creating a forest out of a barren land, the forest department in late 90s entrusted Boringpadar Yuvak Sangh the task of looking after the 500 hectares of reserve forest near his village. The villagers also keep an eye on another 500 hectares of forest near the hills adjacent to the village.

Forest officials say the work by Majhi and local tribals in Kalahandi is an important step in guarding the forest resources.

“Creating a forest and guarding can never be done by the forest department if individuals like Majhi are not involved. A forest guard is supposed to guard an area of 20-25 km. Is it possible on his part to keep an eye on so large an area,” asked Suresh Pant, regional chief conservator of forests of Bhawanipatna.

Preserving the legacy

Despite efforts by Majhi, old-timers of the district are not so hopeful of seeing the luxuriant forest cover of mid-80s when 50% of its geographical area was under forest cover. The last Forest Survey of India published in 2015, put the forest cover at 30%. “The success of people like Majhi is important, but it’s very difficult to get back what we lost,” said former Kalahandi MP Bhakta Charan Das.

Now 75, Majhi can’t walk properly and has problems in his sight. But his son Shankar seems to have inherited his father’s legacy as he goes to the forest with his friends to keep an eye on anyone cutting forests. This year a dozen villagers entered the reserve forest area and tried to cut the trees. They were promptly fined Rs 6,000 by the Yuvak Sangh volunteers.

Majhi says forests are intrinsic to the well-being of tribals. “We can’t always travel to the hospital in Narla block, which is 15 km away. If we suffer from malaria, we take crushed leaves of Nyctanthes, black pepper mixed with honey. The forests give us everything. Jungle is mangal for us,” said Majhi.

August 14, 2017 at 10:02 am Leave a comment

Kosli is an independent and full-fledged language: writer Sanjay Kumar Mishra

Shri Sanjay Kumar Mishra is a well-known writer and researcher. His research interests are folklore, and folk-traditions of western Odisha. He talks to Dr. Sanjib K Karmee about his research work and Kosli language.

SKM1

SKM2

 

June 30, 2017 at 6:20 pm 1 comment

Kalahandi livestock on depletion path

Following report is from TNIE:

BHAWANIPATNA: THE cattle population in Kalahandi district has witnessed substantial decline since 2001. With no support from the local administration, the animal husbandry sector is a victim of manpower shortage and poor infrastructure.
Kalahandi district has three veterinary hospitals, 18 veterinary dispensaries, 119 livestock aid centres, 126 artificial insemination centres. But, the district does not have a regular Chief District Veterinary Officer (CDVO) with the Sub-Divisional Veterinary Officer of Dharamgarh holding the additional charge of the CDVO.

The district requires eight veterinary surgeons but the posts at Lanjigarh, Karlamunda, Borda and Charbahal are lying vacant. The surgeon of Ladugaon veterinary dispensary has been deputed to work in Odisha Biological Products Limited (BOPL) at Berhampur. Similarly, out of 13 posts of assistant veterinary surgeons, seven are vacant. The Bhawanipatna District Veterinary Hospital is functioning without a Deputy Director while assistant veterinary surgeon post is being managed by the livestock inspector. The Deputy Director has been deployed to work at Nayagarh. While the district has 12 sanctioned block veterinary officer posts, seven of them are lying vacant in Kesinga, M Rampur, Thuamul Rampur, Kalampur, Koksera, Jaipatna and Golamunda.
As far as infrastructure is concerned, out of 305 gram panchayats, 142 have no livestock aid centres. Of the existing 119 aid centres, 95 have no power supply. As a result, vaccines and medicines cannot be preserved in refrigerators.

There are 126 artificial insemination centres in the district but 16 of them do not have permanent building. Although there are 115 mobile veterinary units to cater to needs of livestock farmers in inaccessible pockets, several posts in these units are vacant. Each mobile unit requires one veterinary surgeon, a livestock inspector and one attendant.
According to the cattle census of 2001,2007 and 2012, there has been a consistent reduction in livestock population in the district. It is attributed to lack of manpower and infrastructure apart from cattle smuggling by traders to slaughter houses.

The cattle population (cow) came down from 4,81,056 in 2001 to  3,11,732 in 2007 and 3,10,875 in 2012. Similarly, buffalo population declined during the period. In 2001, it was 95,534, in 2007 it was 55,747 and in 2012, the number came down to 43,764.
Currently, the district administration is preparing for 2017 cattle census. Field staff of the Animal Husbandry Department said the livestock population is likely to come down further this time.

WHERE ARE THE VETS?

  • The dist requires 8 veterinary surgeons but 4 posts at Lanjigarh, Karlamunda, Borda and Charbahal are lying vacant
    ● Out of 13 posts of assistant veterinary  surgeons, 7 are vacant
    ● District Veterinary Hospital is functioning without a deputy director

June 30, 2017 at 3:38 pm Leave a comment

Odisha among bottom three states in governance: PAC

BHUBANESWAR: Despite political stability for past around two decades, Odisha continues to remain among the bottom three states on quality of governance, a latest survey of think-tank Public Affairs Centre (PAC), Bengaluru shows.

The PAC’s public affairs index (PAI) published on Friday ranks the state 16th, just above Jharkhand (17th) and Bihar (18th), among the 18 large states. The state comes 27th if all Indian 30 states are considered together. Kerala tops the list.

The state’s rank was 15th among 17 large states in 2016 when Telangana was not considered a separate state. So, the state’s position effectively remains the same third from bottom. The overall rank continues to be 27th this time too, raising a question mark on governance of the Naveen Patnaik regime, which is in power for fourth term in a row since 2000.

The PAC has measured the states on 11 various criteria of governance. Odisha has been ranked the last (30th) in crime and law and order, slipping from its 23rd position last year.

The survey says it has considered rapes, murders, dowry and custodial deaths, police firing, police personnel per 10 lakh population and percentage of women police among the total cops in preparing the index. The state witnessed 2144 rapes and 1328 murders in 2016.

“As the minister in-charge of home department, Naveen is responsible for law and order, an area in which the state is on the bottom among all Indian states. It’s deplorable,” said leader of opposition Narasingha Mishra.

The state also fared badly in delivery of justice (ranked 26th) in which factors such as pendency of court cases, number of under-trials and vacancies in courts were considered. More than 12 lakh cases are pending in various courts in the state including around 1.68 lakh cases in the Orissa high court, official sources said.

BJP spokesperson Sajjan Sharma said the survey only reflect the BJP’s oft repeated allegation of total governance collapse in the state.

BJD spokesperson Samir Ranjan Dash said irrespective of the findings of the survey, the governance in Odisha under Naveen has emerged as a model for others. Many schemes of Odisha such as Mamata, a direct cash benefit scheme for pregnant women was replicated by the Centre. Many other states have opened subsidized cooked meal outlets following Odisha. “I don’t think governance here is bad. Except for Maoists problem, I don’t think the law and order is overall bad,” Dash said.

June 18, 2017 at 9:41 am Leave a comment

Kidney disease spreading rapidly in western Odisha

Patients being examined at a health camp | Express

SAMBALPUR: As many as 108 patients suffer from Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) in Dakra gram panchayat under Maneswar block of the district. With safe drinking water a luxury for the people in several villages of Western Odisha, the disease has taken roots in more areas of the region.

The Government, it seems, is unprepared to counter the alarming situation in the block. While the Government has miserably failed to supply safe drinking water to the affected pockets, the healthcare system too is in doldrums to face the challenge. The medical college and hospital of the region, VIMSAR at Burla, continues to struggle with large-scale vacancies. Adding to the woes of patients, a senior resident of Medicine department has been managing the Nephrology department in the absence of a Nephrologist.
Moreover, the Government is yet to get a survey done to ascertain the exact cause of rising CKD cases. The kidney disorder, which was confined to a few pockets of Western Odisha, has spread to new areas, posing a bigger challenge to the Health department.
The facts came to the fore during a mega health camp organised jointly by Apollo Hospital and Maneswar block BJD in the GP on Thursday, a month after rising cases of CKD were reported in this paper, ‘Kidney deaths stalk Sambalpur villages’.

From about 200 patients screened at the mega health camp, 108 patients were identified with CKD and nearly 86 others with cardiac problems. Patients were examined by Nephrologist Dr Bibekananda Panda and Cardiologist Dr Byomokesh Dixit.
Dr Panda said the reason behind the spread of kidney ailment can  be ascertained after water samples from the GP are chemically analysed  for metal content.

Out of 108 patients identified with CKD, 10 need immediate dialysis while the rest need immediate specialised medical attention, he said. The situation is alarming and immediate health intervention is needed, he added. Apart from water, there are numerous other reasons behind the spread of the disease and all cases need to be identified individually and corrective measures taken, Dr Panda added.Earlier, a study by Red Cross in Dakra Gram Panchayat had revealed about death due to CKD in Dhaunrakhaman village under the GP. The survey also found presence of a large number of such cases in the villages of Dakra, Purnapani, Jaduloisingh, Jhariadera, Golabhanga and Aamkuni, all under the GP. The survey had identified 12 patients with CKD in Dakra village alone and three deaths in the last three months due to CKD.
Adding to the woes of patients, the Health Sub-Centre in the GP is closed in the absence of doctors while there are no paramedical staff to conduct tests or create awareness among the villagers.

May 13, 2017 at 6:16 am Leave a comment

‘Teacher-on-call’ scheme: Retired teachers will teach in primary schools

TC

May 10, 2017 at 4:33 pm Leave a comment

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