Posts filed under ‘News in pictures’

Pictures of the Bargarh Dhanu Jatra 2010-11 closing ceremony

Thanks to Surendra Kumar Hota for the following pictures:

January 21, 2011 at 2:49 pm Leave a comment

Eleven-day Dhanu Jatra begins in Bargarh

Following is from expressbuzz.com:

BARGARH: Curtains went up for the 11-day ‘Dhanu Yatra’, considered the biggest open air theatre of Asia, in Bargarh today.

 With the central theme of this festival borrowed from the ‘Krishna Leela and Mathura Vijay’, the enactment on day one begins with wedding of his sister Devaki with Basudev besides Kansa’s accession to the throne and concludes with ‘Kansa Badha’ at the hands of nephew Lord Krishna.

After the marriage, a confident Kansa moves towards the Durbar of King Ugrasen, his father and dethrones him to capture the kingdom marking the beginning of his tyrannical rule. But the joy of marriage and the pride of his accession to the throne for the demon King is short-lived.

While he moves around atop a caparisoned elephant in a procession along with the newly-wed couple, a divine voice warns Kansa of his impending death at the hands of the eighth child born to Devi and Basudev. The warning is enough for Kansa to put his sister Devaki and her husband Basudev in jail.

 Interestingly, the day one saw the scene shifting from Ramji Mandir in Talipada where celestial wedding of Devaki and Basudev is solemnised, dethroning and accession to the throne besides warning by divine voice at Hatpada and imprisonment of Devaki and Basudev at the makeshift prison at Radha Krushna Temple at Hatpada.

 The entire Bargarh municipal limits, spread over 5 square km, turns into a stage and every citizen plays a role.

The geographical setting of Bargarh municipal limits also conforms to Mathura, where King Kansa ruled. The river Jeera represents the  Yamuna. Ambapali village across the Jeera turns into Gopapur where Krishna is brought up. The festival which is a synthesis of stage, theatre and cinema is held for seven to 11 days preceding the Pousa Purnima.

Thanks to Mr.Surendra Kumar Hota for the following pictures:

January 10, 2011 at 4:56 pm Leave a comment

Maa Samleshwari of Balangir

Thanks to Raj Kumar Bhoi for the pictures:

January 6, 2011 at 10:19 am 1 comment

Chhatishgarh government to develop Nrusinghnath tourist spot

Following report is takem from http://ajitnayak12.blogspot.com:

With out considering the tourism potentiality, when state government is interested for mining in the Gandhamardhan hill, the decision of the Chhattisgarh government to spend Rs.two crores for the development of the Nrusinghnath, natural tourist spot located on the foothill of Gandhamardhan makes everyone happy.

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 Gandhamardhan, the famous range of hill which covers Nuapara, Bargarh and Balangir district of the state is well-known for its medicinal value of having thousands of rare species of medicinal plants. Nrusinghnath in one side and Harisankar on the other side attract lakhs of pilgrims every year. But over the past, state government does not give much attention on the development of these spots because it is interested on the bauxite that reserves in the hill.

The decision of the Chhattisgarh government receives huge appreciation from the local people as they apprehend severe destruction of the natural beauty once mining is taken place in the area. “We do not want mining at any cost as we apprehend serious consequence of the environment once mining is taken place in the area. We also apprehend extinct of the rare species of medicinal plants that are available here. So we welcome the decision of the Chhattisgarh government. I attended the meeting held in Raipur recently where CM Raman Singh took the decision to spend Rs. 2 crores for the development of the Nrushingnath”, former president of the Nrusinghnath trust Pradeep Kumar Purohit said. According to him, the Chhatisgarh government will construct a Panthnivas at Nrusingnath in the first phase, for the benefit of the hundreds of tourists that are coming every day to the famous temple. 80% of the tourists coming to the place are from Chhattisgarh as they consider the place is pious.  But they face serious difficulties as there are no proper accommodation facilities near the temple. Due to lack of accommodation facilities tourists come to the place only in the day time.

Sources said, the Chhattisgarh CM Raman Singh has written a letter to the Orissa chief minister Naveen Patnaik requesting the latter to provide an acre of land for the same. The construction will take place once Orissa state government identifies the requisite land.   Nrusinghnath is considered as ‘papaharini tirtha’ for the people of Chhatishgarh, so a large number of people from the state come every year. To realize the fact, members of the temple trust and Gandhamardhan Yuba parisad met the Chhattisgarh CM Raman Singh to discuss about the improvement of the facilities available in the Nrusinghnath temple area for the tourists.

“It was a pleasant meeting with Raman Singh, the chief minister of Chhattisgarh held at Raipur on last Sunday where he announced about the construction of a huge building for the accommodation purposes”, convener of the Gandhamardhan Yuba parisad.Dhirendra Mohanty said.  “We are thankful to the national general secretary of the BJP Dharmendra Pradhan for coordinating and convening our meeting with Raman Singh”, Pradeep Kumar Purohit said.

July 9, 2010 at 8:37 pm Leave a comment

Pradhanpat waterfall of Deogarh

Following information is taken from http://www.mapsofindia.com:

The Pradhanpat Falls is located at a distance of 100 Kilometers from Sambalpur and also at a reasonable distance from the city of Deogarh. The Pradhanpat Falls is a picturesque waterfall which is surrounded by some of the rarest scenic sights of nature which makes it one of the most beautiful waterfalls of Orissa.

With rolling hill and green woods creating the backdrop, the Pradhanpat Falls cascades down like a stream of colors. A treat for the eyes, the Pradhanpat Falls is one of the greatest treasures of nature. There are two guest houses near the Pradhanpat Falls, the Basanta Nivas and Lalita Basanta and they are the perfect places from where the beauty and charm of the Pradhanpat Falls can be enjoyed most intimately.

Following Pictures are taken from satyeshnaik.blogspot.com:

A map of Deogarh district (Pradhanpat indicated as a red dot).

May 9, 2010 at 12:13 pm Leave a comment

Breakdown in Balangir:families continues to suffer from hunger and poverty

Following is a report from http://www.hindustantimes.com and Print Edition:

As one of India’s 300 million officially poor people in one of its most impoverished districts, Kantamani Nag bought 25 kg of rice every month at Rs 2 per kg — five times cheaper than market rates — a fine example of the world’s most sprawling subsidised-foodgrain network.

Of the sprawling cradle-to-grave national anti-poverty effort on which the Centre will spend more than Rs 1.18 lakh crore in 2010-11 to create a more inclusive, just India, only the Public Distribution System worked for the Nags — sort of.

Nag (40) kept half the rice for his wife and three children. He sold the rest, creating what is now unofficially called “subsidised-rice income” for the poorest in this western corner of Orissa, where the official poverty line is Rs 356 per month, or about the cost of an appetiser in a metropolitan five-star hotel. When Nag, wizened beyond his years, sold his subsidised rice (sometimes tea leaves and soap as well), it sent him into a death spiral that appears to play out like this across Balangir:

The rice that isn’t sold typically lasts 10 days or less. The family works odd jobs or begs rest of the month. Weakened without enough food, they fall ill for about 100 days each year. They borrow money to pay medical expenses. To repay the loan, they join the 100,000 who migrate to brick kilns and stone mines in Andhra Pradesh.

When they return, they are weaker; many die, not by starvation but from chronic hunger and malnutrition.

Nag’s family ended up working in the kilns and mines for six months every year. These trips took a toll on their weakened bodies. They took more loans to meet medical expenses. The last loan was Rs 20,000 at 10 per cent interest.

“After a time they found it difficult to repay,” said Kasturi Nag (42), Kantamani’s sister-in-law, who narrated their tale on a warm spring day in their western Orissa village of Kurenbahali. “As a result, they started eating less food.”

Growing, gnawing hunger

Breakfast for the Nags was a handful of puffed rice and tea without milk. Lunch was pakhal, watery rice, with an onion.

Dinner wasn’t very different — on the few days the Nags had any.

Hindustan Times recorded similar patterns in journeys to 55 families in 27 villages in Balangir, where 62 per cent of all families officially live below the poverty line across 6,575 sq km, more than four times larger than the National Capital Territory of Delhi.

In interviews, many officials in Balangir confirmed that they were witnessing a deepening cycle of poverty.

It could explain how millions of hungry people are slipping through the cracks nationwide; how shoddy implementation imperils well-meaning, ambitious national anti-hunger programmes; how mothers become malnourished, giving birth to more malnourished children than anywhere else in the world.

Every year, 3,000 pregnant women are admitted to Balangir’s hospitals. “More than 50 per cent are anaemic, malnourished,” said Dr Purnachandra Sahu, Balangir’s chief district medical officer. Theoretically, help is available, through the Integrated Child Development Scheme (ICDS), the world’s largest programme for nutritional and school needs of children younger than six, administered through 1.4 million centres nationwide.

Though 80 million children are theoretically covered, one in two Indian children is malnourished, the world’s worst rate.

In Balangir, there are free vitamins, proteins and medicine available.

The Nags appear to have used these centres at some point. The evidence: Their children are alive (though their condition isn’t clear). For severely malnourished children, there’s Rs 500 to be had from the Chief Minister’s relief fund.

Sahu opened registers of Nutrition Day — held on the 15th of each month to provide dietary support to children — to show how about 3,000 malnourished children under age six are brought to Balangir’s 14 primary health centres every month. Sahu said 53 per cent of all children at his centres are malnourished.

In 2009, official ICDS figures say 87 children, or 0.04 per cent suffered the most severe malnourishment, grade IV, which means they needed urgent medical attention.

“The children are malnourished because in most cases the mothers are malnourished,” said Pratibha Mohanty, Balangir district’s social welfare officer.

The death rate of children under six is worsening. In 2006, 48 children died in every 1,000, rising to 52 the next two years; in 2009 it was 51, according to district health records. Balangir’s cycle of poverty continues into adulthood.

Most patients who come to Balangir hospitals today are anaemic, have gastrointestinal infections or are directly malnourished, according to district health records.

Stopping migration would certainly help already weak villagers. Theoretically, the Nags need not have migrated.

The world’s largest jobs-for-work programme, the National Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS), is supposed to help people like them, assuring them 100 days of employment every year. The national NREGS budget for 2010-11: Rs 40,000 crore, more than a third the size of the defence budget.

Here in Kurenbahali, there were no NREGS jobs in 2009. Thus far, there’s no sign of work this year either. “People would not migrate if NREGS works are done regularly through the year,” said Paleswar Bhoi (35), a villager.

Slippery statistics

Instead of the required 100 days, Orissa has provided no more than 35 days of work each year. Across most of Balangir’s 1,792 villages, NREGS work isn’t available for a full month in a year, HT’s inquiries revealed.

Sanjay Kumar Habada, project director for the district rural development agency, has another set of figures to share: NREGS projects across Balangir employ more than 30,000 people, whom the administration pays “We pay them Rs 30 lakh every day,” said Habada. It isn’t much use to the poorest.

Of the 240,000 people registered under the NREGS in Balangir, only 476 (0.2 per cent) live below the poverty line, according to the website of the Union Ministry for Rural Development.

Like a number of Balangir villagers dying in their 30s and 40s — the exact numbers are uncertain — Nag died in February 2008, officially of fever. His wife Kulbati (32) lived for 18 months more before dying of tuberculosis.

The statistics will not record the chronic hunger or malnourishment that possibly made the Nags susceptible to disease.

Officially, they died natural deaths.

Theoretically, the Nags’ children should, even at this stage, have been able to claim help from the state.

When the sole earning member dies, the family is eligible for Rs 10,000 under the National Family Benefit Scheme, created after a Supreme Court order.

The grant is supposed to be paid within four weeks of death: More than 15,000 applications are pending with the Balangir district administration “over years”.

No one can say how many years.

Nag’s sister-in-law, Kasturi, has never heard of such a scheme.

“I gather that many people fail to provide death certificates,” said Balangir Collector Sailendra Dey. “I have instructed officials to help people in submitting the death certificates so that the amount can be disbursed to the beneficiaries.”

Local lawyer Bishnu Prasad Sharma said the grant needed only an authorisation from a local ward member or sarpanch.

Bisnu Sahu, a naib sarpanch (village headman), said he never knew he had such authority. “No one ever told me,” he said.

The district collector, the chief administrative official, implied this was indeed the case. “I have asked officials to make people aware of the scheme,” Dey said.

Back near the Nags’ abandoned hut, Kasturi explained why a severe pain in her leg didn’t allow her to join her husband, son and daughter-in-law in the desperate migration south.

Where are the surviving Nags, the two daughters and a son, aged between  seven and 16? Gone, said Kasturi, to that brick kiln in Andhra Pradesh.

For another generation, Balangir’s death cycle has started.

(The Hunger Project is a Hindustan Times effort to track, investigate and report every aspect of the struggle to rid India of hunger. You can read previous stories in this series at www.hindustantimes.com/hungerproject)

March 29, 2010 at 12:56 pm Leave a comment

Pictures from “Burla Utsav” and “Kalahandi Utsav”

Following pictures are from The Dharitri:

January 18, 2010 at 9:02 pm Leave a comment

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