Posts filed under ‘Kosli Culture’

Kosli is our mother tongue:Padmashri Haldhar Nag

Following is a report from the Sambad:

2553259

September 11, 2016 at 5:43 pm Leave a comment

Actor Atal Bihari Panda

Following is a report from the TNIE:

Atal-Bihari-Panda

BHUBANESWAR: After screening of Odia film ‘Aadim Vichar’ (The Ancient Justice) at the Indian Panorama Category of International Film Festival of India (IFFI-2014) on Tuesday, audience and journalists asked Atal Bihari Panda, protagonist of the film, about his age. Panda, who is attending the IFFI for the second time in a row, gleefully replied, “It is just a number”. The 84-year-old actor, who portrayed the role of ‘Kondh Budha’ (an elderly man of Kondh tribal community) in the film, was appreciated by one and all at the biggest film festival that celebrates Indian cinema.

‘Aadim Vichar’, directed by Sabyasachi Mohapatra, is the octogenarian actor’s second film, the first being ‘Sala Budha’ (The Stupid Oldman) that got the Best State Film Award – Mohan Sundar Dev Goswami Award – for 2013.

Even at this age, Panda’s exuberance was visible at last week’s State Film Awards where Panda danced on a Sambalpuri folk song to a houseful audience at the Utkal Mandap. He also bagged the Best Actor Award for playing the role of ‘Sala Budha’. “I do not let my age shadow my acting skills,” says the Sonepur-based actor. ‘Aadim Vichar’ is a sequel to Mohapatra’s ‘Sala Budha’, a Sambalpuri movie, that dealt with the plight of elderly people in villages of Western Odisha. ‘Aadim Vichar’ portrays the societal structure of Kondh community in Kandhamal. After IFFI, the film will be screened at three more national level film fests.

Panda who was a stage actor and script writer by profession, had never thought of acting in any Odia films. “I got into Sala Budha by chance. Sabyasachi Mohapatra during his youth had done a small role in one of my plays ‘Phata Mardala’, where I played the lead character. Besides, his father Kapileswar Mohapatra and I were classmates. Two years back, Sabyasachi approached me with an idea of converting some of the short stories that Kapileswar authored into a film script,” he recalls. Although the script was ready, Sabyasachi could not find any senior actor in Ollywood to play the lead role of ‘Sala Budha’. “After nearly three months, he came to me again and urged me to be the protagonist of the film. Though I was reluctant initially because of my age and lack of experience in films, Sabyasachi convinced me. I was 82 when shooting for the film started, but today I am extremely thankful to my director for giving me this opportunity. He has taught me how to face the camera,” he says. Prior to ‘Sala Budha’, he had done a 45-minute tele-film ‘Dangar Tale Dambaru Baba’ on tribal communities in Odisha for Doordarshan.

‘Aadim Vichar’, Panda says, is the most difficult role he has played so far. He has written the script, based on Kapileswar’s stories, for this film as well. “Aadim Vichar is a longer film compared to Sala Budha and was shot in the hilly terrains of Kandhamal during winter. Since, it is a much more intense movie compared to ‘Sala Budha’, a lot of research and practice went into it,” says Panda, who has acted in over 100 plays apart from writing 63 dramas and six operas, both in Odia and Koshali language.

Both Sabyasachi and Panda are making three more films based on the tribal culture of Odisha and they would begin shooting for their third venture next year. Given a choice, Panda says, he would chose art films over commercial cinema any day. “I want to die a death like Balai Banerjee did. A popular stage actor of Janata Rangamanch of Cuttack, he died while acting on the stage. I too want to breathe my last on the stage,” Panda smiles.

December 2, 2014 at 8:21 am 1 comment

Nuankhai celebrated in Western Odisha

Following is a report from the TNIE:

SAMBALPUR: Nuakhai, the agrarian festival of Western Odisha, was celebrated with gaiety and religious fervour across Western Odisha on Saturday.

With rain lashing the district, people chose to remain indoors and spent time with their families in performing the rituals and enjoying the festivity. The Nabanna (newly harvested rice) was offered to Goddess Samaleswari, the presiding deity of Sambalpur, at the stipulated lagna (auspicious moment) between 10.58 am and 11.13 am. During this period, families also offered the Navanna to their respective Istadevata (presiding deity) and Goddess Laxmi (Goddess of Wealth) as a mark of gratitude for a bumper harvest, good rain and a favourable weather.

While it was Goddess Samaleswari in Sambalpur, it was Patneswari in Balangir, Sureshwari in Sonepur, Sekharbasini in Sundargarh and Manikeswari in Kalahandi whowere worshipped. Being an agrarian festival, the eldest in each household in rural pockets worshipped their paddy fields and cattle. Womenfolk woke up early in the morning to perform Nuakhai rituals that began withdecoratingthe house with ‘jhoti’. While children in colourful attire enjoyed their holiday to the fullest, devotees across the region thronged Samaleswari temple. Later in the evening, ‘Nuakhia Bhetghat’ were organised by different socio-cultural organisations.

September 5, 2014 at 10:46 am Leave a comment

Premiere of Kosli language movie “Ishwar”

Following is a report from the Sambad:
Iswar

June 28, 2014 at 6:43 am 1 comment

Matkhai festival concludes with a Koshali language play

Following is a TOI report:

BALANGIR: A play in Koshali language was the highlight of the concluding day of five-day national multi-lingual theatre festival ‘Matkhai Mahotsav’ at Balangir on Saturday. The festival was organized by socio-cultural organization Bhumika.

The play ‘Gara Bandha’ revolved around erstwhile royal tradition of hunting by kings. Gara Bandha was a man, who used to accompany kings and symbolized the prey during hunting.

“The play depicted the life and struggle of a Gara Bandha. It portrayed the exploitative royal tradition. Through the play we want to send a message across the society how in the past right to life was violated,” said president of the festival Chittaranjan Das.

Odia play ‘haat’, based on plight of bonded labourers, pulled huge crowd as Balangir is known for large-scale migration. Another play Gabbar Ghichor in Bhojpuri also portrayed migration woes.

A Delhi-based drama troupe performed Nachnia (dancer), based on struggle and livelihood of dancing community. “The play mirrored how the dancing communities were looked down upon by the society. They were artiste yet they never got due recognition and respect,” said Dharmendra Nanda, member of the festival.

On the closing day, BJP state president K V Singhdeo attended the festival as chief guest.

“Matkhai Mahotsav is not only offering entertainment through plays but also proving to be a tool for spreading socio-economic and socio-political awareness,” said chairman of the festival Narasingh Mishra. Matkhai is the name of a hill, situated on the outskirts of the town.

February 3, 2014 at 12:32 pm Leave a comment

Tribal culture of western Odisha: special focus on tribal dance and music of Sudergarh district

Following report is from the Sambad (Thanks to Birat Raja Padhan for the pointer):

Sundergarh

December 2, 2013 at 1:01 pm Leave a comment

Remembering legendary music director late Saroj Nanda

Following report is from the Sambad:
Nanda

October 1, 2013 at 9:39 am 2 comments

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