Posts filed under ‘Kosli Culture’

Nuankhai celebrated in Western Odisha

Following is a report from the TNIE:

SAMBALPUR: Nuakhai, the agrarian festival of Western Odisha, was celebrated with gaiety and religious fervour across Western Odisha on Saturday.

With rain lashing the district, people chose to remain indoors and spent time with their families in performing the rituals and enjoying the festivity. The Nabanna (newly harvested rice) was offered to Goddess Samaleswari, the presiding deity of Sambalpur, at the stipulated lagna (auspicious moment) between 10.58 am and 11.13 am. During this period, families also offered the Navanna to their respective Istadevata (presiding deity) and Goddess Laxmi (Goddess of Wealth) as a mark of gratitude for a bumper harvest, good rain and a favourable weather.

While it was Goddess Samaleswari in Sambalpur, it was Patneswari in Balangir, Sureshwari in Sonepur, Sekharbasini in Sundargarh and Manikeswari in Kalahandi whowere worshipped. Being an agrarian festival, the eldest in each household in rural pockets worshipped their paddy fields and cattle. Womenfolk woke up early in the morning to perform Nuakhai rituals that began withdecoratingthe house with ‘jhoti’. While children in colourful attire enjoyed their holiday to the fullest, devotees across the region thronged Samaleswari temple. Later in the evening, ‘Nuakhia Bhetghat’ were organised by different socio-cultural organisations.

September 5, 2014 at 10:46 am Leave a comment

Premiere of Kosli language movie “Ishwar”

Following is a report from the Sambad:
Iswar

June 28, 2014 at 6:43 am 1 comment

Matkhai festival concludes with a Koshali language play

Following is a TOI report:

BALANGIR: A play in Koshali language was the highlight of the concluding day of five-day national multi-lingual theatre festival ‘Matkhai Mahotsav’ at Balangir on Saturday. The festival was organized by socio-cultural organization Bhumika.

The play ‘Gara Bandha’ revolved around erstwhile royal tradition of hunting by kings. Gara Bandha was a man, who used to accompany kings and symbolized the prey during hunting.

“The play depicted the life and struggle of a Gara Bandha. It portrayed the exploitative royal tradition. Through the play we want to send a message across the society how in the past right to life was violated,” said president of the festival Chittaranjan Das.

Odia play ‘haat’, based on plight of bonded labourers, pulled huge crowd as Balangir is known for large-scale migration. Another play Gabbar Ghichor in Bhojpuri also portrayed migration woes.

A Delhi-based drama troupe performed Nachnia (dancer), based on struggle and livelihood of dancing community. “The play mirrored how the dancing communities were looked down upon by the society. They were artiste yet they never got due recognition and respect,” said Dharmendra Nanda, member of the festival.

On the closing day, BJP state president K V Singhdeo attended the festival as chief guest.

“Matkhai Mahotsav is not only offering entertainment through plays but also proving to be a tool for spreading socio-economic and socio-political awareness,” said chairman of the festival Narasingh Mishra. Matkhai is the name of a hill, situated on the outskirts of the town.

February 3, 2014 at 12:32 pm Leave a comment

Tribal culture of western Odisha: special focus on tribal dance and music of Sudergarh district

Following report is from the Sambad (Thanks to Birat Raja Padhan for the pointer):

Sundergarh

December 2, 2013 at 1:01 pm Leave a comment

Remembering legendary music director late Saroj Nanda

Following report is from the Sambad:
Nanda

October 1, 2013 at 9:39 am 2 comments

Trailer of Sabyasachi Mohapatra’s new Kosli language movie “Sala Budha”

December 5, 2012 at 11:43 pm 2 comments

Balijatra of Remunda, Bargarh

Following a report from the Sambad:

November 15, 2012 at 11:18 pm Leave a comment

Patkhanda Jatra of Jarasingha, Balangir district

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 27, 2012 at 10:12 am Leave a comment

Blend of Dalkhai dance and Bhaijiuntia festival

Update: Following is a report from TOI:

BHUBANESWAR: The traditional form of worshipping Goddess Durga through dance and music has started. Young unmarried girls (locally called kuanris) in Nuapada district are performing ‘Dalkhai’ – a traditional form exclusively performed during the puja – to worship the goddess.

Dalkhai, though typical to western Odisha, is slowly losing its popularity. However, the entire Komna and parts of Khariar blocks in Nuapada have kept up the tradition. The dance is performed for 36 hours to the tunes of dhol (trumpet) and muhuri (flute).

Every year, the dance is performed at a chosen spot, preferably near a river. The ritual starts in the early morning on Saptami. Young dancers, accompanied by musicians, collect sacred sand from the river bank and make idol of the goddess. They place the idol under a tree and worship it. After the rituals are over, they start dancing till evening the next day ( Ashtami). During the process, performers have to fast.

According to Bana Khatri, a resident of Komna, this is a much coveted moment for girls here. “The tradition dates back to primitive days and young girls feel sacred after worshipping Durga and dancing before Her,” said Khatri.

The dance form, which is also performed publicly, can be traced back to the old tradition practiced in Nuapada when untrained dancers used to perform in order to appease the Goddess. Considered as a folk dance, Dalkhai captivates audience if performed in the original form.

A senior villager, Pitambar Letkabar, said over years, the original dance form has been distorted. “One needs great devotion to perform this dance. The young girls perform the dance joyously and devotedly,” said Letkabar.

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 23, 2012 at 2:09 pm 1 comment

Jhamujatra: a tribal festival of Lanjigarh

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 9, 2012 at 1:28 pm 1 comment

Older Posts Newer Posts


Categories

Feeds

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 462 other followers


%d bloggers like this: