Posts filed under ‘Folk music and musical instruments’

Odisha govt. suppressing Kosli language and culture

Following report is from the Pioneer:

There is a deliberate attempt by the Government of Odisha to suppress the Kosli language and culture, alleged Kosal Kranti Dal (KKD) working president Baidyanath Mishra at a Press conference here on Wednesday.

He said teachers and para-teachers are being recruited to appease the minor ethic groups, including Bengali and Telugu, in the State whereas Kosli spoken by almost one and a half crore people is neither given official status nor is any step being taken for its growth due to a high degree of inferiority complex on the Government’s part.

Mishra said thousand of books in Kosli using Odia script have been published in different branches of Kosli literature, but the Government does not have any affirmative stance for promoting the rich literature. This “step-motherly attitude” towards Kosli, coupled with acute regional imbalance and other parochial considerations, has led to discontentment among the people concerned and a strong opinion to split the State.

“The recent activities of the Government and some NGOs have posed a threat to Kosli language and culture,” he alleged and called upon the people of ‘Kosalanchal’ to remain alert. The strategy of “Utkalisation of the Kosal areas” is a calculated one, but the Government has not been successful in the past nor would it be successful in future because of its ill motive as negative action would only bring negative result, he remarked.

Mishra was launching Kosli No-1, a music album brought out by Karan Raj and his young team. Congratulating all those involved in the project, he advised them to adopt the twin strategy of promotion and safeguard for their language and culture.

Editor of Paschimanchala Surama Mishra was the guest of honour on the occasion. Sagar Singh Manki, Ram Chandra Amat, Jai Singh Singh and Hrudanand Behera were among others present.

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December 22, 2011 at 1:14 pm Leave a comment

Rasarkeli, Dalkhei enthrall audience : TOI report

Following is a TOI report:

BHUBANESWAR: The city swayed to ” Rasarkeli” and ” Dalkhei” on Sunday as natives of western Odisha settled in the state capital organized the annual grand cultural extravaganza of Nuakhai Bhetghat here.

The 1000-strong audience at Adivasi Padia was left spellbound as girls dressed in traditional sarees performed these folk forms, popular in the tribal-dominated western part of the state. Ghudka nacha of Bargarh, Samprada of Barpali amd Danda nacha of Dumerdhipa were the other major attractions. “It was a marvellous show,” said Venkat Kumar, a student.

Speaker Pradip Amat, Western Odisha Development Council chairperson Padmini Deo, among others, attended the cultural show, named after agrarian festival Nuakhai. The get-together is being organized in the state capital since 1972.

Mahendra Nayak, Western Odisha Agrani Sangathan, organizer of the event, said this year’s bhetghat was dedicated to eminent poet Gangadhar Meher, marking his 150th anniversary. The sangathan has instituted a Gangadhar Meher Samman this year. Eminent literary personality Manindra Kumar Meher has been selected for the award for the first time, he said.

Nayak said the sangathan has acquired two acre land on the banks of Bhargavi river at Hirapur village to build a Samalei temple. Besides, land has been acquired to build a village for 120 western Odisha families near Nandankanan, he said.

December 12, 2011 at 12:49 pm Leave a comment

Culturally Kosal and Kosli

Following pictures are taken from Face book page of Beni(albums):

August 4, 2011 at 5:50 pm Leave a comment

A picture of Jitendriya Haripal, Krishna Patel, Mitrabhanu Gountia, and Prabhudutta Pradhan

Following picture was taken from face book page of Koshal Pradesh (Thanks to Saket Sahu, Editor of Beni, for posting this picture):

July 26, 2011 at 11:43 am Leave a comment

Folk dances enthral audience at Sambalpur

Following report is from expressbuzz.com:

SAMBALPUR: Even as Sambalpur shivered, the biting cold could not deter art lovers from thronging the Gangadhar Mukti Manch on the second day of the 15th Sambalpur Lok Mahotsav here this evening.

The evening began with traditional folk song of the district followed by solo performance of ‘Dhunkel’, a musical instrument on the verge of extinction. It was followed by foot-tapping folk dances of Dalkhai by artistes from Sambalpur, Sohala Suanga and Ravanchaya dances by artistes from Angul, Daka of Phulbani, Jamudali by artistes from Sonepur, Bajasaal by artistes from Kesinga in Kalahandi and Dandari dance from Jharsuguda.

Besides, folk dances like Mathuri from Andhra Pradesh, Gajijhumar from West Bengal and Holi by a troupe from Madhya Pradesh captivated the audience. Devoid of much of entertainment, the gathering left impressed  and spellbound with scintillating performance by the folk artistes.

Sambalpur University Vice- Chancellor AK Pujari, Chairman of Orissa Lift Irrigation Corporation Rohit Pujari, MARKFED Chairman Prabhataditya Mishra attended.

January 6, 2011 at 9:38 am Leave a comment

An account of the folk music of western Orissa

Following report is from the expressbuzz.com:

BALANGIR: Dulduli, Parva, Karma, Dalkhai. These traditional folk music forms have a special meaning and their significance is reflected in various festivals of Balangir. Although these traditional music forms are fading, yet they come alive during festivals like Dussehra.  

 The exclusive rhythms of each form has a special meaning that is meant to appease the presiding deity of a particular place. Every year during Durga Puja, these musical forms get a new lease of life.

Tankadhar Mishra, an expert who has done research in traditional music, said folk music differs from place to place. “In Balangir, if one visits a village, he will find musical forms and rhythms changing with the region. For example, Karma music that is dedicated to Karmasani deity, has a different rhythm. But it may sound different in another place,” he said.

Although different presiding deities have different tastes, there is a common music form known as Sula Khadi (sixteen rhythms) which is applicable for all Goddesses representing Shakti. During Shakti puja at various Shakti ‘pithas’ here, Sula Khadi is mandatory to invoke Devi’s blessings.

Historian Sadananda Agrawal said not a single folk music here is bereft of religious connection. “It is the religious connection that makes the affair special. The rhythms are identified with the choices of different Goddesses,” he said.

October 19, 2010 at 6:52 pm Leave a comment

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