Posts filed under ‘Dalkhai, Rasarkeli, Bhamara, Nialmalli, Jaiphula and others’

Eminent danseuse Gurubari Mirdha passes away

Following is a report from the Pioneer:

Because she took birth on Gurubar (Thursday), parents kept her name Gurubari, which is a practice people follow in most part of the State. And, finally she also breathed her last on a Thursday.

Gurubari Mirdha from a nondescript village in Bargarh district left a void as she passed away recently with people of the State, particularly art connoisseurs, still remembering her sterling performance as a noted Sambalpuri and Dalkhai dancer. She had tremendous contribution to popularize Sambalpuri and Dalkhai dance in the country and singularly she was enough to keep the audience spell bound for hours together through the beats of her feet. Not irrelevant to mention that she even made former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi to dance on the stage with her as Gandhi as an audience could not help it before the enthralling dance Gurubari was performing in Delhi.

But with so much talent in her, she was unable to cash in on it for her financial security. Almost during her entire life period, she was living a very miserable life. As a BPL person, she had been allotted an Indira Awas, but that she couldn’t be completed as yet.

In the year, 1987, an Odia vernacular daily carried a detail story about her poverty that drew the attention of the people abroad. And, moved by the report, Odia artist from Sweden PK Mahanadia wrote a letter to Surendra Hota of Bargarh expressing his willingness to help her financially. But at that time Gurubari couldn’t be traced as she went out of the State as a Dadan Shramik (migrant labourer) to another State.

“Think the fate of a versatile dancer opting to work as a Dadan Shramik with whom the Prime Minister of India had once danced. This is also fate of many people in Odisha who came in direct contact with many dignitaries, but remain poor forever. The case of Fanus Punji of Kalahandi is another bright example,” said Sureswar Satapathy, an elite citizen of Bargarh.

Under her guidance, a college teacher in Bargarh wrote a short play entitled ‘Lekri’ (torn up clothes ) that narrated the poverty of the versatile lady artist. The play depicts how all prizes, medals, felicitations and citations etc were meaningless for her and she needed money for survival that nobody gave her. But that drama couldn’t be staged as yet although it was completed when Gurubari lived.

“Till end of her life, a small pension from the Government and mercy of the villagers was the main source of her livelihood,” said her villagers.

October 25, 2016 at 7:32 am Leave a comment


Following report is taken from

In the month of Aswina, on the Mahaastami day of Durga Puja, people of Western Orissa celebrate Bhai Juntia. A total fasting is observed by young girls and women for the entire day and night to seek the blessings of Goddess Durga for amelioration and long life of their brothers. In villages young girls usually dance in small groups during this celebration which is known as Dalkhai dance. Dalkhai is a ritual-based folk dance which is accompanied by several musical instruments as well.

Dalkhai is basically a folk deity. Her abode is known as Dalkhai kuthi. The name Dalkhai is derived from the name of the deity as the dance is performed in her name. In the past, people worshipped the jungle deity to protect themselves from the wild animals and other dangers. Afterwards the deity became synonymous with Durga or Bana Durga. Usually through this dance they pray for the general happiness of the family and the village as a whole.

On the Durga Astami day young girls assemble on the bank of a river or a pond to take bath. One of them brings seven palm-full of sands and built a small platform for worship, they put four mango leaf and place burning wicks on them. This ritual is repeated seven times as seven girls bring palm-full of water and follow the same ritual. Thereafter prayers are offered to goddess Dalkhai for the well-being of their brothers. This is followed by songs and dances, where all the people – young or old – participate with equal enthusiasm. Earlier during the dance, young girls and boys join together in a question answer session.

In the afternoon, at Pantibela, all the girls assemble near the Dalkhai Kuthi with their baskets containing sand and other materials for worship. Some of them get dressed like Parvati and Iswara, while the rest of them carry umbrella, a stick and a water jug (Kalsi). In a procession they move to seven houses and come back to the Dalkhai Kuthi. Inside the Dalkhai Kuthi they perform several acts of the mythology. One of them acts as Bhima and some other act as Kubera. Bhima brings paddy from Kubera and sows it in the field. Songs and dances enacting various scenes from the mythology are essential part of Dalkhai.

Returning home the girls prepare for further rituals. They prepare leaf cups containing piece of sugarcane, yellow thread called ita?, 108 pieces of duba (evergreen grass), 108 pieces of unbroken rice; along with it small branches of Amla and Dahana (a sweet smelling leaf), puffed rice and dhup are placed. Separate leaf cups are arranged for each brother.

After taking bath in the river bank they prepare platform for worship. Fruits like ladies finger, frankincense (Kunduru) etc. are placed as offerings to the goddess Dalkhai. Then they change their clothes and carry their baskets and assemble near the Dalkhai Kuthi. They collect seven clay statues of Parvati, Iswara, Ganesha, Tortoise and Bull are placed inside the Dalkhai Kuthi. The ritual starts with Dhunkel and Bharni beat of the dhol. It is often seen that a person becomes possessed by a spirit of one of the deities. The villagers ask several questions regarding the wellbeing of the village. The ritual then comes to an end.

On the ninth day, all the girls again assemble near the Dalkhai Kuthi. After collecting all the articles used for the ritual on the previous day, they move in a procession accompanied by drumming of dhol and nissan to seven houses and then to the river bank to immerse all the articles. After taking bath they return home, and the 108 dub, 108 rice and yellow thread are offered to their brothers. Till the end of the tenth day of Dasahara, they are engrossed in Dalkhai dance. The entire village plunges into an energetic mood by the intoxicating effect of the melodious song and dance.

Dalkhai is performed as a ritual, whereas dance and song remains its principal interest. The dancers stand in a semi-circular formation during the dance. One after another they sing a couplet and at the end of it they dance in a particular way by bending at the waist level and move their feet rhythmically accompanied by musical instruments.

During the song dhol is played and subsequently other musical instruments like Nishan, Tasha, Jhanj and Muhari are accompanied.

The songs are composed from couplets to sixteen lines. The singer begins the song uttering “Dalkahi Re, Dalkahi Re” (twice) and finishes the lines with another pronouncement of “Dalkahi Re”. Mostly the songs are of romantic themes. At times one can find the description of nature, seasons, gods and goddesses; sometimes satire and teasing also. The singers have to depend entirely on their memory while rendering the songs – presence of mind comes handy.

During rendering Dalkhai usually Raserkeli, Mailajada, Jaiphul are also rendered. The lyrical depiction of Rasarkeli, MaelaJada and Jaiphula may look similar with Dalkhai. However, the song and rhythm of drums has different beats and style.

Dilip Kumar Padhi VU2DPI

October 15, 2016 at 3:10 pm Leave a comment

Blend of Dalkhai dance and Bhaijiuntia festival

Update: Following is a report from TOI:

BHUBANESWAR: The traditional form of worshipping Goddess Durga through dance and music has started. Young unmarried girls (locally called kuanris) in Nuapada district are performing ‘Dalkhai’ – a traditional form exclusively performed during the puja – to worship the goddess.

Dalkhai, though typical to western Odisha, is slowly losing its popularity. However, the entire Komna and parts of Khariar blocks in Nuapada have kept up the tradition. The dance is performed for 36 hours to the tunes of dhol (trumpet) and muhuri (flute).

Every year, the dance is performed at a chosen spot, preferably near a river. The ritual starts in the early morning on Saptami. Young dancers, accompanied by musicians, collect sacred sand from the river bank and make idol of the goddess. They place the idol under a tree and worship it. After the rituals are over, they start dancing till evening the next day ( Ashtami). During the process, performers have to fast.

According to Bana Khatri, a resident of Komna, this is a much coveted moment for girls here. “The tradition dates back to primitive days and young girls feel sacred after worshipping Durga and dancing before Her,” said Khatri.

The dance form, which is also performed publicly, can be traced back to the old tradition practiced in Nuapada when untrained dancers used to perform in order to appease the Goddess. Considered as a folk dance, Dalkhai captivates audience if performed in the original form.

A senior villager, Pitambar Letkabar, said over years, the original dance form has been distorted. “One needs great devotion to perform this dance. The young girls perform the dance joyously and devotedly,” said Letkabar.

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 23, 2012 at 2:09 pm 1 comment

Sambalpuri song market downturn: industry suffers from creativity and copyright issues

Following report is from the Sambad:

April 29, 2012 at 2:09 am Leave a comment

Odisha govt. suppressing Kosli language and culture

Following report is from the Pioneer:

There is a deliberate attempt by the Government of Odisha to suppress the Kosli language and culture, alleged Kosal Kranti Dal (KKD) working president Baidyanath Mishra at a Press conference here on Wednesday.

He said teachers and para-teachers are being recruited to appease the minor ethic groups, including Bengali and Telugu, in the State whereas Kosli spoken by almost one and a half crore people is neither given official status nor is any step being taken for its growth due to a high degree of inferiority complex on the Government’s part.

Mishra said thousand of books in Kosli using Odia script have been published in different branches of Kosli literature, but the Government does not have any affirmative stance for promoting the rich literature. This “step-motherly attitude” towards Kosli, coupled with acute regional imbalance and other parochial considerations, has led to discontentment among the people concerned and a strong opinion to split the State.

“The recent activities of the Government and some NGOs have posed a threat to Kosli language and culture,” he alleged and called upon the people of ‘Kosalanchal’ to remain alert. The strategy of “Utkalisation of the Kosal areas” is a calculated one, but the Government has not been successful in the past nor would it be successful in future because of its ill motive as negative action would only bring negative result, he remarked.

Mishra was launching Kosli No-1, a music album brought out by Karan Raj and his young team. Congratulating all those involved in the project, he advised them to adopt the twin strategy of promotion and safeguard for their language and culture.

Editor of Paschimanchala Surama Mishra was the guest of honour on the occasion. Sagar Singh Manki, Ram Chandra Amat, Jai Singh Singh and Hrudanand Behera were among others present.

December 22, 2011 at 1:14 pm Leave a comment

Rasarkeli, Dalkhei enthrall audience : TOI report

Following is a TOI report:

BHUBANESWAR: The city swayed to ” Rasarkeli” and ” Dalkhei” on Sunday as natives of western Odisha settled in the state capital organized the annual grand cultural extravaganza of Nuakhai Bhetghat here.

The 1000-strong audience at Adivasi Padia was left spellbound as girls dressed in traditional sarees performed these folk forms, popular in the tribal-dominated western part of the state. Ghudka nacha of Bargarh, Samprada of Barpali amd Danda nacha of Dumerdhipa were the other major attractions. “It was a marvellous show,” said Venkat Kumar, a student.

Speaker Pradip Amat, Western Odisha Development Council chairperson Padmini Deo, among others, attended the cultural show, named after agrarian festival Nuakhai. The get-together is being organized in the state capital since 1972.

Mahendra Nayak, Western Odisha Agrani Sangathan, organizer of the event, said this year’s bhetghat was dedicated to eminent poet Gangadhar Meher, marking his 150th anniversary. The sangathan has instituted a Gangadhar Meher Samman this year. Eminent literary personality Manindra Kumar Meher has been selected for the award for the first time, he said.

Nayak said the sangathan has acquired two acre land on the banks of Bhargavi river at Hirapur village to build a Samalei temple. Besides, land has been acquired to build a village for 120 western Odisha families near Nandankanan, he said.

December 12, 2011 at 12:49 pm Leave a comment

Folk dances enthral audience at Sambalpur

Following report is from

SAMBALPUR: Even as Sambalpur shivered, the biting cold could not deter art lovers from thronging the Gangadhar Mukti Manch on the second day of the 15th Sambalpur Lok Mahotsav here this evening.

The evening began with traditional folk song of the district followed by solo performance of ‘Dhunkel’, a musical instrument on the verge of extinction. It was followed by foot-tapping folk dances of Dalkhai by artistes from Sambalpur, Sohala Suanga and Ravanchaya dances by artistes from Angul, Daka of Phulbani, Jamudali by artistes from Sonepur, Bajasaal by artistes from Kesinga in Kalahandi and Dandari dance from Jharsuguda.

Besides, folk dances like Mathuri from Andhra Pradesh, Gajijhumar from West Bengal and Holi by a troupe from Madhya Pradesh captivated the audience. Devoid of much of entertainment, the gathering left impressed  and spellbound with scintillating performance by the folk artistes.

Sambalpur University Vice- Chancellor AK Pujari, Chairman of Orissa Lift Irrigation Corporation Rohit Pujari, MARKFED Chairman Prabhataditya Mishra attended.

January 6, 2011 at 9:38 am Leave a comment

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