Posts filed under ‘Health Services’

Survey finds health care in trauma in Kalahandi and Balangir districts

Following is a report from the Telegraph

Bhubaneswar, Aug. 12: Another case of dengue death was today reported from the SCB Medical College and Hospital in Cuttack, while swine flu has already claimed nine lives in the state this year.

When the state is facing multiple health issues, a Bhubaneswar-based organisation, the Centre for Youth and Social Development (CYSD), has conducted a survey on the issue and challenges of primary heath care facilities in the two most backward districts – Kalahanadi and Balangir. The survey reveals how people are still not getting basic health services, including ambulance services.

The study was conducted in Balangir and Patnagarth constituencies of Balangir district and Narla and Junagarh constituencies of Kalahanadi district. The infamous Daana Majhi case that was reported last year, where Daana had to carry the body of his wife for nearly 12 kilometres after being unable to get the ambulance, was reported from Kalahandi district. In these four constituencies, a total of 37 primary health care centres have been selected by the organisation. The study covered primary health care centre, sub centres, villages and communities in these areas.

The expert team interviews 50 per cent of out patient department (OPD) patients visiting each PHC. The patients were selected on the basis of convenience and snowball sampling method. They were asked to share their satisfaction levels and experience at the primary health care centres. Total 370 patients (10 patients from each primary health care centres) were covered. Besides, the grassroots services providers – Accredited Social health Activists (Asha), auxiliary nurse midwives and anganwadi workers were interviewed on implementation of various government schemes.

They find unavailability of buildings as a major problem in imparting health care service to the patients. In absence of adequate and habitable staff quarters, it won’t be possible to put a check on doctor absenteeism and 24X7 primary health care centres won’t function smoothly. The primary health care centres need to be converted into 24X7 centres with in-patient department facilities.

Provision of safe drinking water and power back up (important in case of power failure during emergencies) are also major issues at the primary health care centres. The unavailability of diagnostic services and referral transport is causing a lot of difficulties for the people. While in some instances people are bound to pay higher prices in getting their medical condition resolved, in other cases, many are often showing lack of interest due to lack of money (thus, turning again to traditional healing methods or quacks).

The service providers also showed displeasure in many aspects. The doctors showed discontent regarding unavailability of staff quarters leading to daily commuting to the primary health care centres (few of them which are in remote areas).

Though medicines never run out of the stock and the quality of the medicine is good, the people don’t trust the quality of medicines as they think that government medicines are free and therefore, might be of poor quality. In many cases, doctors allegedly prescribe expensive medicines that patient parties have to buy from outside.

Asha and auxiliary nurse midwives are the health activists in the community who create awareness on health and its social determinants and mobilise the community towards local health planning and increase utilisaton and accountability of the existing health services. But these service providers face various issues at the ground level, such as communication problem, excessive field area and too much workload.

The survey report also alleges that the Asha workers are losing interest and motivation to carry out their regular duties as they are not getting incentives at the right time. Some of them also remained absent on the MAMATA Divas which is held on the second Friday of every month. Due to this continuous absenteeism, the beneficiaries have started losing trust on Asha workers.

Another major issue is lack of ambulance facilities and the people depend on their own bikes and bicycle, to reach to hospitals. Lack of ambulance facilities often turn out to be fatal for pregnant women. The status of 102 and 108 ambulance services is in highly deteriorated condition and people have been grossly disappointed.

CYSD co-founder Jagadananad said: “The study is an attempt to understand the nuances of the primary health care services provided at the grassroots and to gather the perceptions of the community regarding the services like access to health, infrastructure, human resources.”

Delivery in auto-rickshaw

A woman of Sunakhandi Tikarpada village in Kalyansighpur block of Rayagada district delivered a baby in an auto-rickshaw on her way to the hospital on Saturday. Her family members alleged that though they called the 102 ambulance service to rush her to Kalyansinghpur Community Health Centre after she complained of labour pain, the ambulance did not turn up.

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August 16, 2017 at 7:20 pm Leave a comment

Naveen seeks release of funds for five medical colleges from Centre

Following is a report from the Sambad:MC

March 20, 2017 at 6:26 am Leave a comment

Separate hospital for Balangir medical college

Following is a report from the TNIE:

BHUBANESWAR: The State Government has decided to build separate hospitals for the new medical colleges at Balasore, Balangir and Puri. The hi-tech hospitals are likely to be ready within next six months.

While construction of buildings for the medical colleges is underway, it was earlier decided that the existing district headquarters hospitals (DHHs) will be upgraded as per the norms of Medical Council of India (MCI).

The Centre had approved establishment of five Government medical colleges and hospitals at Balasore, Koraput, Balangir, Baripada and Puri in 2014. It was announced that all five medical colleges would have student intake capacity of 100 each and around `200 crore would be spent for upgradation of the DHHs to a full-fledged medical college and hospital in each district.

While existing DHHs at Koraput and Baripada are being upgraded as per the MCI norms, it is not feasible to upgrade the hospitals of rest three districts, sources said.
Health Secretary Arti Ahuja said at a high-level meeting chaired by the Chief Secretary, it was decided that separate hospitals will be constructed for the medical colleges at Balasore, Puri and Balangir.

“The Works Department will prepare the estimate for these new hospitals on and without turn-key basis. The estimate for equipment, instruments and furniture (EIF) will be prepared separately,” she said.Though it has not been decided whether the construction work will be done on turn-key basis, the Works Department has been asked to submit the estimate on turn-key basis and also separate estimates for civil work and EIF by September 30.

Since the Government is willing to start admission in these new medical colleges next year, ideally the infrastructure should be ready by March next. The admission can only be possible after a team from MCI gives its nod following infrastructure inspection.
While Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik had laid the foundation stone for the medical college at Balasore on October 28, 2014, the same at Puri and Balangir was done on July 4 and August 30 last year. The Government has also created posts for these medical institutions.

October 17, 2016 at 4:50 pm Leave a comment

Dana Majhi effect: Medical college site earmarked

BHAWANIPATNA: The Kalahandi district administration has earmarked a 40-acre land near Bhanagabari village, four km from here, on the NH-59 that connects Khariar-Nuapadadistrict for the proposed medical college.

Collector (Kalahandi) Brundha D said it is a suitable place for the hospital as it is well-connected. The land belongs to directorate of animal husbandry and veterinary services. “We will inform the state government to make a final call,” the collector said. Following Dana Majhi issue, the state government announced to set up a government medical college here and subsequently it had asked the district administration to find a 25-acre land near Bhawanipatna.

Sub-collector Sukanta Tripathy (Bhawanipatna sub-division) said a place was required for the setting up of the medical college within five-km radius of the town and the patch fulfils the criterion.

September 17, 2016 at 5:27 am Leave a comment

Odisha’s healthcare in shambles; helpless patient’s plea for medical care goes unheard in Sundargarh

Following is a report from http://odishasuntimes.com:

In a heart wrenching incident that should put Odisha Government’s tall claims on healthcare facilities to shame, a helpless old man was today spotted by local reporters lying on the veranda of Sundargarh district headquarters hospital awaiting medical care since past eight days.

The frail looking man – identified as Pawan Bodra — is suffering from diarrhoea. He admitted himself in the hospital on August 31 seeking medical attention. However, without a family member or caretaker to attend to his needs, all that he has been given by the hospital staff is a saline.

“I have been suffering from diarrhoea and came here for treatment. I can’t see a doctor around. I am lying here in hunger. No one has offered me any help,” said the Bodra fumbling, with his hands trembling out of weakness.

Even though the saline pipe was still connected to his body, his condition was pitiable as he laid there on the hard ground without any bedding, medicine or clean clothes.

The hospital authorities, however, claimed that the patient was mentally unstable even though we could make no such observation from our conversation with the patient.

“The patient has certain neurological deficits along with diarrhoea. He keeps coming out on his own no matter how we try to keep him in the ward. He doesn’t have an attendant with him. We are unable to keep an eye on him round the clock,” said Sundargarh CDMO Sashi Bhusan Nayak.

“We are not neglecting him. We are changing his clothes regularly. We have asked the Sulabh folks to clean his clothes,” he added.

September 11, 2016 at 4:20 pm Leave a comment

Naveen announces medical college for Kalahandi

Following report is from http://www.telegraphindia.com:

Bhubaneswar, Aug. 30: The Odisha government will set up a medical college in Kalahandi with the help of the Vedanta Group that will extend infrastructure support of Rs 100 crore, chief minister Naveen Patnaik announced today.

The announcement, which followed a meeting between the chief minister and Vedanta chief Anil Agarwal here, came close on the heels of outrage over a tribal having to carry his wife’s body on his shoulders from a hospital in the district for 16km.

“The proposed medical college will be run by the government,” Patnaik said. A medical college will also ensure a mandatory 500-bed hospital.

Kalahandi, known for acute backwardness and poverty, does not have a medical college. The Sardar Rajas Medical College Hospital & Research Centre, set up by a private promoter in 2013, was shut down last year as the Medical Council of India withdrew recognition, citing lack of infrastructure.

“A medical college and hospital is needed in Kalahandi. We will provide infrastructure support worth Rs 100 crore,” Agarwal said.

The government will provide the required land and manage the medical college and the hospital.

Vedanta, which has been running a 1-million-tonne alumina refinery in Lanjigarh in the district, has been assured by the state government of raw material through the state-run Odisha Mining Corporation (OMC).

The refinery has been running only at 40 per cent of its capacity because of non-availability of bauxite ore. “We have been assured by the state government that we will be provided long-term raw material linkage through the OMC,” Agarwal said.

Steel and mines minister Prafulla Mallick said: “We will provide raw materials to the Vedanta from Kodingamali bauxite reserve in Koraput district.”

August 31, 2016 at 8:34 am Leave a comment

What can be done for Odisha’s abject poverty?

We have received the following e-book from Dr Saheb Sahu, USA

What can be done for Odisha’s abject poverty? Please click here to download the E-book.

January 27, 2016 at 8:30 am 1 comment

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