Posts filed under ‘Sambalpur-Rairakhol-Kuchinda’

Twelve departments of VSSUT gets UGC recognition

Following report is from the Sambad:

November 17, 2012 at 12:48 pm 1 comment

Sambad examines problems surrounding Sambalpur University

Following report is from the Sambad:

July 30, 2012 at 3:35 am 1 comment

Who is responsible for the underdevelopment of western Odisha? Videos of Kanak TV debate

This was a lively debate. Expect few leaders everyone spoke within the scope of the topic. Otherwise, now day TV debates are often turning brawl and theatrical stage. I observed that all most all leaders spoke in Kosli language. They  should also use Kosli language in assembly; so that people of western Odisha will understand them. The discussion was about health, education and human resource development  in western Odisha (Balangir and Kalahandi Medical college, AIIMs and other centrally funded institutes); industrialization; pollution in Sambalpur-Jharsuguda belt; KBK issues, Dadan sramik; malnutrition; starvation death; unemployment; Gadjats; feudal mentality of political leadership; and Kosal state demand.

People of western Odisha feel alienated because their voice is not heard by the mainstream Odia media. Thanks to the Kanak TV for providing a platform to people of western Odisha (although one speaker was accusing the organizers about the choice of the title and divide and rule policy).

July 15, 2012 at 1:21 am Leave a comment

Alleged Plagiarism case in Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar: A Global View

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Sanjib Kumar Karmee <sanjibkarmee@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, Apr 6, 2012 at 12:23 PM
Subject: OTN: Alleged plagiarism case in Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar: A Global View
To: govori@ori.nic.in, govodisha@nic.in, cmo@ori.nic.in, cmo@nic.in, registrar@suniv.ac.in, vc@suniv.ac.in, nmahakud@gmail.com, behera.dk@gmail.com, arun.k.pujari@gmail.com, akpcs@uohyd.ernet.in
Cc: Samukhya <samukhya@yahoogroups.com>, KDDF <westernodisha@googlegroups.com>, orissatoday@googlegroups.com, orissa-education-forum@googlegroups.com, Orissa Pioneer <orissapioneer@gmail.com>, “Editor of orissadiary.com” <editor@orissadiary.com>, “orissadiary .com” <orissadiary@gmail.com>

After reading a report in the Times of India (27th March 2012), I went back to read the original article written by ex-VC of Sambalpur University Prof. Arun Kumar Pujari. [1] In his blog www.sweekaarokti.blogspot.in Prof. Pujari posted a write-up entitled “Plagiarism and Jyoti Vihar”.

Here is the link to original blog post by Prof. AK Pujari:

http://www.sweekaarokti.blogspot.in/2012/03/plagiarism-and-jyotivihar.html

The blog post of Prof. AK Pujari starts with the plagiarism row happened in IISc Bangalore. This incident made headlines in India while it was found that a publication by Prof. Rao, Prof. Krupanidhi along with two students Basant Chitara and L. S. Panchakarla lifted few sentences from another publication.[2] Later the authors apologized to the journal. Not only that, the lead authors even wrote to the editor to withdraw the paper. But, the article was retained by the editor citing its importance. Basant Chitara (the PhD student) had said that he had lifted few sentences without realizing its consequence.

Recently, I came to know that the Hungarian president Pal Schmitt was stripped of his doctorate title for plagiarism and later he had resigned from his job because of this case.[3] Similarly, earlier a German minister Mr. Guttenberg gave up his doctorate title because of plagiarism. [4] I can just go on as there are thousands of such examples.  Two academician, Adam Marcus and Ivan Oransky have been maintaing a nice blog on plagirism (http://retractionwatch.wordpress.com/) and alerting the research community about it. I often visit this blog and find it useful.

These incidents indicate following things:

 Culture and attitude problem:

We are promarily a copy paste society. In most of our primary schools we start mogging everything before the examination and we write exactly what is written in books. Such practices are common across India as it fetch marks to students. I was told by some of my IIT Madras friends that some of the IIT-coaching centres too follow similar practices. But, at the end students succeed in examination and this makes both the students and their parents happy. But in this process a part of the creativity is lost.

Lack of knowledge about plagiarism among Masters and PhD students:

In most of the Indian Universities there are no short term courses to on plagiarism. Various Universities in the Netherlands and Germany, where I have done most of my research work do organize seminars and short term courses on plagiarism. Such activities make the students aware of the consequences of plagiarism and how to avoid such cases. Recently, in India IITs, IISc and other institutes are taking initiatives to organize such awareness programmes.

Lack of time to supervise Masters and PhD students:

Plagiarism cases are common in the group where professors are heavily engaged in research and teaching without thinking about their time availability. Many Professors think that having well equipped labs and whole lot of research students will fetch them good numbers of publications. But, doing good science is not about labs and students. It is also about regular discussions (of  (literature and research findings) with research students, proper supervision and thorough checkup of the manuscripts. Some times Professors are unable to perform all these duties because of lack of time and large size of the group. Thus, my conclusion is that the group leaders should give adequeate time to PhD students. They should instruct each new students on how to write a manuscript and also, let the students know about the consequences of plagiarism.

Too much work pressure:

Every now and then some supervisors ask the research students to produce results and  publish papers. Because of too much pressure; some cases of plagirisms are reported with regard to scientific result manipulation.

After having analyzed the possible causes of plagiarism; let us take a look on the case of Sambalpur University case. Prof. AK Pujari mainly talks about two things: i) students are coping from teacher’s notes, books, and from internet sources while writing the examination. and ii) Plagiarism of PhD thesis books in Sambalpur University. The first thing is common acsoss in India and as I have pointed out earlier it is a cultural problem. Here as a society we need to change.

Now let us take a look on the allegations by Prof Pujari about the PhD thesis plagiarism in Sambalpur University. I have nothing against Prof. Pujari. But, why Prof. Pujari was so far silent in this case? He has said that he was threatened. However, I feel that, he could have formed a committe to look in to this matter as soon as he was aware of it. In most of the European Universities there are committees to investigate cases of plagiarism and to punish the academicians. Why Prof. Pujari did not constitute such a committe for Sambalpur University? If, what he says is true, then he was just watching helplessly while there was growing plagiarism in Sambalpur University. In this regard, Prof. Pujari owe a proper explanation to all aluminous , present students and staff of Sambalpur University.

Immediately, the present VC, Prof. Barik should call a meeting of the senate, members of student council, members of staff council, and alumni association. After that a committee should be formed to investigate the case of plagiarism of PhD thesis in Sambalpur University. In the mean time, Prof. Pujari should prepare a list of PhD thesis which he think are plagiarised. In fact, he should handover this list and other evidences to chancellor-his highness Shri Murlidhar Chandrakant Bhandare, VC of Sambalpur University, Media and other SU affiliated bodies.

At this point, there is no point in attacking each other (as reported in TOI and other new papers). Let the investigation complete and it will be for all of us to see the truth. In fact, the Sambalpur University authority should scan the alleged plagiarized PhD thesis and put it on the internet; so that, we can check for ourselves if the allegations made by ex-VC are true. If the allegations are found to be false, then the University authority should  file a defamation case against Prof. Pujari and proceed further.

References:

1.http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bhubaneswar/Ex-Jyoti-Vihar-VC-alleges-plagiarism-in-PhD-thesis/articleshow/12423139.cms

2.http://www.nature.com/news/indian-science-adviser-caught-up-in-plagiarism-row-1.10102

3. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17586128

4. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-12532877

Dr. Sanjib Kumar Karmee, PhD

Alumnus, Sambalpur University (MSc Chemistry, 2000 Batch),

Odisha, India

April 6, 2012 at 7:01 am 1 comment

Clipping autonomy will hurt the growth of Sambalpur University Institute of Information Technology (SUIIT)

See the following TOI report. Some people are proposing to bring Sambalpur University Institute of Information Technology (SUIIT) under Sambalpur University Such a move will hamper the growth of the institute because it will lose its decision making and administrative power to Sambalpur University. All of us know that Sambalpur University administration is too slow because it is already overloaded with work of many affiliated degree colleges.

The govt. is taking steps to make some colleges autonomous; thus reducing the work load of Sambalpur University to some extent. Sambalpur University should cut down such unnecessary work load and devote it-self completely towards opening more undergraduate, PG and integrated PhD courses.

To hold or not to hold SUIIT hand

BHUBANESWAR: Proposals are gaining ground to bring Sambalpur University Institute of Information Technology (SUIIT) under varsity statutes. A large section of the university fraternity, however, is strongly opposing any move to dilute the autonomy of SUIIT.

The two-year-old self-sustaining institute, considered the biggest success story ever for the varsity, enjoys complete financial, administrative and academic autonomy as of now. “We are not against autonomy of SUIIT. But since it is a constituent of the varsity, it should be within the framework of university statute and University Grants Commission (UGC) rules, as enjoyed by other autonomous departments of the varsity,” said professor B K Tripathy, a member of the varsity Syndicate, a representative body of educationists in the varsity. “We have requested the vice-chancellor that the matter should be discussed in the next Syndicate meeting,” he said.

A brainchild of former vice-chancellor Arun Pujari, the institute was established in 2010 as an autonomous constituent of SU. It imparts MCA, B.Tech, M.Tech and M.Sc in computer science, M.Sc in electronics and M.Sc in bioinformatics in a self-financing mode. Some of these courses were pulled out from different existing departments of the varsity and brought under SUIIT. The state government had given an initial budget of Rs 10 crore in 2009-10 for the institute.Directorate of Distance and Continuing Education (DDCE) of the varsity gave another Rs 5 crore for construction of its buildings.

Those lobbying to bring it under the varsity statute say there are other departments in the varsity, which are also running self-financing courses. So, why should SUIIT be given so much special privilege? “The idea is to bring transparency in SUIIT functioning and strengthen it further,” said professor Antaryami Panda, a Syndicate member and director of Academic Staff College.

Currently, a governing board and an executive council under the vice-chancellor takes decisions on the functioning of the institute. Though the VC nominates two Syndicate members to the board, neither the Syndicate nor the Senate (the apex decision making body of the varsity) has direct say in its affairs. SUIIT appoints its own faculty on contract and arranges visiting faculty from internally generated funds.

Members of the varsity fraternity said since the model of the institute is on the lines of International Institute of Information Technology, Bhubaneswar, it should be left to grow on its own. “The university should do hand holding for initial few years and gradually give it more autonomy. That will help the institute to grow. Bringing it under the varsity may kill the institute,” said Bhabani Hota, president of All India University Employees’ Confederation.

The University Employees Association has strongly opposed any attempt to curtail the SUIIT autonomy. “Some vested interests are trying to ruin SUIIT. We will agitate against any such attempt. It has brought glory for the university,” said Mahendra Mishra, president of the association. SUIIT, which offers B.Tech in IT and computer science, should expand and open B.Tech in civil, electrical and mechanical disciplines, he added.

January 17, 2012 at 8:32 pm 2 comments

Pathetic state of affairs at the VSS medical college Burla

Following is a report from the Sambad:

January 7, 2012 at 9:18 am Leave a comment

State of 2011 health care in Odisha far from rosy

Following is a report from TOI:

BHUBANESWAR: Patient care going for a toss due to prolonged strike of junior doctors across all government medical colleges sums up the situation of healthcare in the state this year even as the government announced a number of new initiatives.

Around 800 house surgeons and PG students, the backbone of healthcare services for both indoor and outdoor patients in the three medical colleges, went for tool down, demanding “proper security to them during duty”. Several surgeries had to be postponed and emergency care was affected in the three apex institutions.

Junior doctors in Burla stopped work on September 5 following alleged attacks on them a day earlier on September 4. After the state announced a sine die closure of the college on September 7, the medics reassembled for an indefinite stir in the state capital on September 9. Their counterparts in Cuttack and Berhampur joined them on September 15 and 16 respectively, expressing solidarity with their demands of security, arrest of alleged main culprit Sisir Dandia and withdrawal of “false” charges against the demonstrators. Several rounds of talks with the government failed to bring back the medicos to their work and classes. Despite hectic parleys with the government, the strike went on till September 24. The Orissa high court had to intervene to end the stalemate ultimately. The HC asked the government to improve security on the campus and remove encroachments inside the Burla hospital campus.

Meanwhile, despite tall posturing by the government to have taken initiatives for several new medical college proposals, nothing concrete materialized during the year, either in private or in the government sector.

While the year saw no progress in the 2004 proposal of Western Orissa Development Council to set up a medical college in Balangir, Sahyog Healthcare and Research Foundation (SHRF) of India is yet to acquire land for its proposed college in Keonjhar. The SHRF a few days ago got some New York-based venture capitalists to invest $100 million in the project for a period of five years though.

Besides, the fate of Employees’ State Insurance Corporation’s proposed medical college at Bhubaneswar still hangs in balance with nothing more than a boundary coming up at the proposed site, government sources said. ESIC had proposed in 2008 to set up a medical college in Odisha. The state government had allotted 25 acres of land in the city for the Rs 800-crore project in 2009.

The planning and coordination department of the state government had sanctioned Rs 10 crore each for medical colleges in Rourkela, Jaring (Kalahandi district) and Balangir in public-private partnership. The government provided 25 acres of land each to these proposed colleges, being facilitated by WODC. Though the colleges in Rourkela and Jaring are in advanced stages of completion, uncertainty still prevails about their likely date of commissioning.

Similarly, the government also failed to initiate a kidney transplant facility at SCB Medical College and Hospital, Cuttack, this year. It has now set a target of early 2012 to launch the programme.

The state government can, however, boast of at least four major initiatives such as launching the Centre-funded Janani O Sishu Suraksha Karyakram (JSSK), Mamata scheme for pregnant women and commissioning of the e-blood bank service this year. “It has been one of those happening years in health. Initiatives such as JSSK and Mamata were launched for pregnancy and neonatal care. We also started Dots Plus for TB patients,” said Dr Upendra Kumar Sahoo, director of health services.

Under the JSSK, the government promises to bear all expenditure related to delivery and newborn care. The free entitlements under the programme of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) include free and cashless delivery, free Caesarean Section, free treatment of sick newborns up to 30 days, exemption from user charges, free drugs and consumables, free diagnostics, free diet during stay in the health institutions (three days in case of normal delivery and seven days in case of C-section), free provision of blood, free transport from home to health institutions, free transport between facilities in case of referral as also drop back from institutions to home after 48 hours stay. “It would go a long way to reduce neonatal and maternity deaths,” the DHS said.

The state launched Mamata scheme in July, under which the government promises to give Rs 5,000 to pregnant women in villages. An estimated seven lakh pregnant women and newborn babies in rural areas would benefit from the scheme every year. As per the scheme, aid would be given to each pregnant woman in four installments. First Rs 1,500 would be paid after six months of pregnancy with registration and vaccination in an anganwadi centre. The second Rs 1,500 would be given when the newborn is three months old. The third and fourth installments of Rs 1,000 each would be paid when the newborn is six and nine months old respectively.

Critics dismiss both Mamata and JSSK, however, as pre-poll sops ahead of panchayat elections in the state in February.

Among the most commendable initiatives in the year passing by was the e-blood bank initiative. Earlier this month, the government started bar-coding of blood bags to ensure blood collected first is used first in 100% cases. The web-enabled system facilitates electronic monitoring of blood collection, testing, storage and final use or disposal. Timings of all these steps can now be known from anywhere in the blood bank network.

The electronic screening can detect professional donors as all blood banks are interlinked to eliminate professional donation, which is still around three to four per cent. “It is for the first time in the country that such an initiative was launched in blood safety,” said Mangala Prasad Mohanty, honorary secretary of Odisha branch of the Indian Red Cross Society.

December 27, 2011 at 8:23 am Leave a comment

Odisha govt. in dark over VSS Medical College and Hospital land encroachment case

Following report is from the Telegraph:

Cuttack, Dec. 5: The Odisha government today admitted in the high court that it had no clear picture on the extent of encroachment on the 108 acres of land allotted to VSS Medical College and Hospital as demarcation of the land had not been completed so far.

“The district administration has taken up demarcation of the land and the same is expected to be completed within a period of three months,” commissioner-cum-secretary of revenue and disaster management department Raj Kumar Sharma said in an affidavit filed today.

“After demarcation, the total number of encroachment on the said land shall be finally determined. All possible steps shall be undertaken by the district administration to clear the hospital land of encroachment at the earliest,” Sharma said. “Some 55 encroachers, who had constructed unauthorised structures on the VSS campus, have been evicted,” he added.

The affidavit skirted the issue of the lack of a boundary wall at the state-run medical college hospital. Taking note of it, the two-judge bench of Chief Justice V. Gopala Gowda and Justice B.N. Mohapatra today directed for listing of the case after one week. The court expected the government to file a detailed status report by then.

The court was adjudicating on a PIL, along with intervention petitions filed by junior doctors, in connection with unauthorised occupants and the lack of a boundary wall at the VSS.

According to the petitions, the institution has no boundary wall. The medical college and the hospital do not have a common campus. There is no compound wall either of the hospital or of the medical college and areas of both are encroached upon. The hospital, the medical college and its hostels are divided because of encroachment by vendors.

Consequently, there has been “free access” and “unauthorised interference” by outsiders, including persons with criminal records, on the VSS campus, of which “doctors and students have become the victims”.

In pursuance of a high court order, the government filed a status report on security provided for students, doctors and patients at VSS on October 19. But, it was silent on steps taken to address the problems of unauthorised occupants and the lack of a compound wall.

Taking note of it, the high court granted the government 10 days to file a status report on it. Later, the court fixed a fresh seven-day deadline for submission of the report when the government sought more time for it on October 31.

December 6, 2011 at 2:34 pm Leave a comment

Sambalpur may get a college of veterinary science

Following is a report from the Telegraph:

Bhubaneswar, Dec. 4: Private institutes in the state have started approaching the Odisha University Agriculture of Technology (OUAT) for affiliation, following passing of the OUAT bill.

The bill was passed on August 23 amending the Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology Act, 1965, to enable the university to accord affiliation to institutions in the private sector for imparting education in agriculture, veterinary, fisheries, forestry and allied sciences.

While two private colleges in the capital have approached the authorities, a former professor of the varsity is said to be considering the idea of setting up an agricultural college, sources said.

“We have been approached by about three private educational institutes,” said M. Kar, director of planning, monitoring and evaluation director at the OUAT.

“The response after the passing of the bill was as expected and there is every reason why it should be so. There is a good demand for the subjects.

“There are sufficient job opportunities for students of agriculture. They can get into research, banking, civil services, voluntary organisations and corporate sectors,” he said.

However, the university had not been able to make much advancement as the bill was yet to be officially communicated, said an official.

“Only after a formal communication reaches us, we can work towards the formalities of forming the rules and regulations for affiliation. The sooner it is completed, the easier it is for the university to approve the affiliation,” said S.K. Ray, registrar, OUAT.

“The colleges can then be approved on the basis of guidelines, including land, infrastructure, student intake and staff strength and others,” he said.

While students are keen to take admission in the constituent colleges of the OUAT, the existing intake capacity of the varsity is limited.

This year, the university had received about 12,000 applications for admission in 608 seats in various courses in the colleges of agriculture, agricultural engineering, fisheries, veterinary science and home science.

The university is also working towards the establishment of two constituent colleges. There will be a college of veterinary science in Sambalpur and a college in dairy technology in Baripada.

December 5, 2011 at 10:58 am Leave a comment

Prof Bishnu Charan Barik is the new Vice-Chancellor of Sambalpur University

Following is a report from TOI:

BHUBANESWAR: Putting to rest all controversies over the re-appointment of the incumbent vice chancellor for a three-years term, Governor M C Bhandare on Thursday appointed Bishnu Charan Barik the new vice-chancellor of Sambalpur University. Barik, an ex-pupil of the university, is currently professor of sociology at the Swami Ramananda Teerth Marathawada University in Nanded (Maharashtra).

“No pleasure can match that of working in your alma mater. I am very fortunate to have got a chance to work at the Sambalpur University where I did my post graduation,” he said.

Speaking to TOI over phone from Pune, Barik said he would fix his list of priorities soon after talking to faculty members and students. Being an alumnus of SU, Barik said he was already acquainted with the varsity, many faculty members and employees, which would be an added advantage for him.

Barik, who hails from Sabalong Kanipara (Chandol) in Kendrapara district, did his graduation from Kendrapada College, PG (sociology) from Sambalpur, MPhil from South Gujarat University and PhD from Sardar Patel Univerity. He specializes in rural sociology and has done extensive research on agrarian studies, migration and dam/water management, among others.

University insiders have welcomed Barik’s appointment. “We welcome the selection and look forward to the vision of the new V-C. Since he is an ex-student, he would be able to feel the pulse of the campus and take the best steps in the interest of the university,” said Karunakar Supakar, the chancellor’s nominee in the Syndicate, the apex decision making body of the university.

In the race for the prestigious post, Barik edged past Rajaram Panda (JNU) and present V-C Arun Pujari. Sources said the chancellor’s office was reluctant to give a second term to Pujari because that would have violated UGC norms. Besides, possibilities of his taking up the duties for a second-term had created a furor among a section of the faculty members and students. Panda, on the other hand, did not have sufficient active teaching experience. The chancellor had interviewed the three on October 15.

Earlier, the selection-cum-search committee, comprising Gujarat cadre IAS officer Pramod Mishra (Syndicate nominee), former Allahabad University V-C A Mehta (UGC nominee) and Delhi University’s Prof Poonam Saxena (chancellor nominee), had shortlisted the three names for the coveted post.

October 28, 2011 at 3:37 pm Leave a comment

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