Posts filed under ‘Arts and Crafts’

Centre of handicraft training-cum-design, Sambalpur

Earlier it was reported that Sambalpur will get an Apparel Training and Design Centres (ATDC). Is Centre of handicraft training-cum-design is another name of centre of handicraft training-cum-design or a different institute?

Following is from TOI:

SAMBALPUR: There’s good news for the artisans of western Orissa. The directorate of handicraft and cottage industries finally set up a centre of handicraft training-cum-design in Sambalpur on Wednesday for the benefit of local artisans. The centre will provide design development skills to artisans in order to help them produce articles in keeping with the market demand.

“The main aim of the centre is to provide design skills to artisans. There are many artisans who are engaged in traditional art and crafts, but they often face difficulties in making their products suitable to the changing market demand. The centre will equip them with design development skills in order to help them craft their products to cater to the new trends in the market,” the director of handicraft and cottage industries, Nityananda Palei, said. While inaugurating the centre at Kuluthkani area in Sambalpur town, Palei said they have recruited designers from Rajasthan to provide training to artisans keeping in mind current demand trends.

Sources said the Sambalpur training school would be the second such venture in the state. A similar centre is already functional in Bhubaneswar. The State Institute for Development of Arts & Crafts (SIDAC), an independent body under the directorate of handicraft department, will look after the centre. Twenty artisans from Bolangir, Sundergarh, Sambalpur, Deogarh and Bargarh have been selected for the training programme that will begin from this month.

“This time we have decided to provide design development skills to artisans who are already in the field. We have decided to cover others arts and crafts in future,” the executive director of SIDAC, B K Dash, said. According to him, the duration of training will be one year and lodging will be provided to the trainees free of cost with a stipend of Rs 1,000 per month to meet their food expenses.

On the other hand, artisans are elated at the opening of such a training centre in Sambalpur. They hope that through the centre they would able to develop their existing design skills.

“The setting up of the training centre at Sambalpur is a welcome step. Design development skill training will definitely give a new look to traditional arts and crafts industry,” said Paramanada Rana of Bolangir and Promaod Maharana of Bargarh, two artisans who have joined the centre to improve their skills in terracotta art.

February 7, 2011 at 10:20 am Leave a comment

Nonfunctional Sonepur spinning mill of Subarnapur district

Following report is from The Samaj:

July 31, 2010 at 6:52 am Leave a comment

About National Rural Development Council (NRDC), Subarnapur district

Following is some information from its home page: 

Empowering rural people, Artisans to recognize their potential, capacity to act to improve economic status, living standards and social injustices have been the manifesto of NRDC since inception i.e. 1994. A developmental wave has created for rural poor artisans SHGs of Subarnapur and adjacent district by NRDC. When we retrospect our work of more than a decade it gives us immense pleasure by seeing the growth of our artisans.
 
 
Registration :
 
NRDC has been registered under society registration act 1860 on 2nd January 1995 having No.-51/59.
 
Organisation Value :
 
Social Responsibility
Convergence
Facilitating Market
Appropriate Technology Transfer
Skill and Product Development
 
Operational Area :
 
NRDC has been working in Subarnapur KBK district along with adjecent Boudh, Bolangir and Deogarh district of Orissa. The target people are specially women SHGs groups, Rural artisan, Craftsman, Weavers, unemployed youths.
 
Mission & Vision :
 
NRDC has set a vision of facilitating livelihood for rural artisans with a holistic approach, which includes capacity building and sustainable development concepts.
 
 
  Revival of Languishing Craft.
 
Coverage of artisan under Janashree Bima Yojana and Rajiv Gandhi Shilpi Swasthya Bima Yojana to Provide Social Security.
 
Facilitating market.
 
Design & Technical assistance to the artisan for better quality production.
 
Construction of Workshed for poor & needy artisan of Subarnapur District. for all weather Production.
 
Appropriate     technology   transfer
Skill and product development.
 
Convergence
 
Executive Board :
 
Sl. No. Name Designation
1. Rama Chandra Mishra
S/o- Dukhishyam Mishra 
At – Jhar Bolangir
Po – Bubel  
Dist – Bolangir
Mob.- 919938416775
Chairman
2. Gopinath Meher
S/o – Kapil Meher
At/Po – Chadaipank
Dist- Subarnapur
Mob -919937769915
Vice- Chairman
3. Pradip Ku. Mohapatra
S/o- Shyam Sundar Mohapatra
At -Lehedi, Po-Dharmasala
Dist – Subarnapur
Mob – 9194371 51893
Member Secretary
4. Rajesh Ku. Mishra
S/o – Binod Bihari Mishra
Bhagawati Colony, Sonepur
Dist – Subarnapur
Ph- 916654 220694
Asst. Secretary
5. Ashok Ku. Mishra
S/o – Late Suramani Mishra
LIC Colony, Sonepur
Dist – Subarnapur
Ph- 916654 220280
Treasurer
6. Niranjan Meher
S/o- Narayan Meher
At- Kendupali, Po- Kamalpur
Dist – Subarnapur
Mob – 919937809360
Director
7. Laxman Meher
S/o- Kampala Meher
At- Rathisahi, Po- Birmaharajpur
Dist – Subarnapur
Mob – 919938318180
Director
8. Bhubaneswar Rana
S/o- Chintamani Rana
At- Kuibahal, Po- Mahada
Dist – Subarnapur
Mob – 919937500324
Director
9. Gokula Jhara
S/o- Sangobinda Jhara
At- Jampali, Po- Singhijuba
Dist – Subarnapur
Ph – 916653215859
Director
10. Smt. Baigani Jhara
W/o- Gokula Jhara 
At-Jampali, Po- Singhijuba
Dist – Subarnapur
Ph – 916653215678
Director
 

May 9, 2010 at 10:08 am Leave a comment

Orissa government to set up sericulture R&D Institute

Following is a PTI report:

Bhubaneswar, Apr 15 (PTI) Targeting a production of about 500 tons of silk by 2020, the Orissa government today said it would set up a research and development centre for speedy growth of the sector.

“Sericulture has a vast potential in the state. It should be utilised to provide livelihood to tribals and backward caste people… the government would set up State Sericulture Research and Development Institute for proper management and growth of the sector,” Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik said at a workshop on sericulture management here.

Though present growth rate of silk industry in India is about eight per cent, demand for the fabric is growing at 10 per cent, Handloom and Handicraft Minister Anjali Behera said.

While 10,000 weavers in the state need 500 tons of silk, Orissa produces only 81 tons. “The need is to strengthen the sector to fill the gap,” the minister said.

April 15, 2010 at 5:46 pm 1 comment

Odisha Govt. okays five-year perspective plan for the handloom and textile sector

Following is a report from The Pioneer:

The State Government on Friday finalised a five-year perspective plan for the handloom and textile sector. It put stress on the welfare of the weavers and giving marketing linkage to their products.

A decision to this effect was taken at a high-level meeting chaired by Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik at the State Secretariat.

About Rs 182.73 crore would be spent in these sectors in the next five years.

It was decided that emphasis would be given on the disbursement of loans to the weavers. More Women Self-Help Group would be involved in all these programmes. Handloom culture would be set up. Discussions were also held on creating a pension fund for those weavers who have already crossed 60 years.

In a bid to provide the necessary raw material to the weavers, he said 353 common facility centres would come up across the State with an investment of Rs 11.80 crore.

Steps would be taken to invite more investment in the field of handloom and textiles

January 30, 2010 at 7:53 pm Leave a comment

Ikat,Tussar, and Bomkai attracts unprecedented interest in world’s largest home-textile fair

Following is a report by IANS (text taken from http://www.thaindian.com):

By Manik Mehta; Frankfurt, Jan 17 (IANS) Despite uncertainties that still plague the world’s home-textile industry with low demand and high unemployment in many traditional markets, India dominated the ongoing four-day Heimtextil fair in Frankfurt – the world’s largest fair for home textiles and furnishing products – by presenting the world’s biggest exhibitor contingent.

India dominates the show in sheer numbers: a record number of 385 exhibitors even surpassed, for the first time, the 381 exhibitors from Germany, the host country that has for decades presented the largest contingent of exhibitors. China with 380 exhibitors took the third position, though some German experts predicted that China could possibly overtake India at future events.

An elated Ajit Kumar, Indian consul general in Frankfurt, described India’s numerical superiority at the Frankfurt fair as a “signal” about India’s “forward march” in the textile industry.

“Germany is our leading trading partner in the European Union and not, as some believe, the UK or France. In 2008, India’s two-way trade with Germany amounted to 13.4 billion euros, with the balance slightly in favour of Germany. Textiles, which are India’s top export item, accounted for some 24 percent of India’s total exports to Germany,” Kumar said in an interview with IANS at the fair.

Some of the textile products India exports to Germany include man-made fibres, wool, raw and processed cotton, raw silk and silk yarn, among others.

While some Indian exhibitors complained about the “lukewarm response” at the show, the overall mood of Indian exhibiting companies was much better than in 2009 when the world was caught in the grip of a severe economic crisis and demand had plummeted.

Ashish Agarwal, partner at Balaji Overseas of Agra, which exhibited floor coverings and rugs, said that “2010 brings us hope which we can discern at this show in Frankfurt”.

“We are happy that business has not declined but stabilised and shows signs of rising in the future,” he said. Like Agarwal, other exhibitors also saw the proverbial light at the end of the dark tunnel.

Arti Ahuja, textile commissioner in Orissa’s department of textile and handloom, was “pleasantly surprised” with the “unprecedented interest” in hand-woven textiles, Ikat (yarn tie and dye), Tussar (wild silk) and Bomkai (handwoven jacquard) from Orissa.

“Despite the recession which seems to be receding, we had good number of visitors and received serious business enquiries,” she said. Orissa Minister for Textiles and Handicrafts, Anjali Behera, was also on a two-day visit to the Frankfurt show to promote her state’s textile products.

Detlef Braun, the managing director of Messe Frankfurt GmbH, which organised the Heimtextil show, spoke of the “positive overall mood” at the show, reflecting that the majority of participants were happy with their performance.

Braun sounded euphoric about China and India which, he believed, were “doing very well”.

“The large presence of exhibitors from these two countries provides testimony to the upbeat mood of suppliers at the show. India is an extremely important market for us. In fact, it is one of the most promising markets of the world,” Braun told IANS.

January 17, 2010 at 11:37 am Leave a comment

Balangir Lok Mahotsav: Rural products a hit

Following is a report from expressbuzz.com:

In an age where people prefer shopping malls to the crowded markets, the Palli Shree Mela has at the Lok Utsav has been attracting a huge number of visitors.

The products are being sold in stalls put up by different self help groups (SHG) funded by different government agencies. District Supply and Marketing Society (DSMS), which is a part of Orissa Rural Marketing Society (ORMAS), is monitoring the sales and helping SHGs sell their products from the stalls.

Attractive motifs, handicraft, paddy-craft, hand loom, earthen designs and food items have been a major draw among customers.Craftsmen from 29 districts are participating in the mela where stalls have been allotted to 104 groups.

Chief Executive Officer of DSMS Kamalendu Paul said this year the sale proceeds have exceeded last year’s. In 2008 while the sale proceeds in two days were recorded at nine lakhs, this year it has nearly doubled. “We have only facilitated the SHGs to sell their products in the mela”, said Paul.

Different agencies such as DSMS, Mission Shakti, Municipality, DIC, Nabard and Watershed funded the SHGs group to make the products.

With the mela recorded a sales of Rs 17 lakh in just two days, DSMS is hopeful of touching a crore mark this year by the end of the Lok Utsav.

December 9, 2009 at 11:35 am Leave a comment

Bargarh and Sonepur among the 20 pilot handloom clusters of India

Following map is taken from http://www.indianhandloomscluster-dchl.net/index.asp.

Handloom

BS

Baragarh cluster: http://www.indianhandloomscluster-dchl.net/Bargarh

Bargarh Handloom cluster is spread over the entire Block of Bargarh, Attabira, Bijepur and Sohella. The cluster has 7158 numbers of looms as per the survey report of the zonal Handloom office taken up during the year 2004 out of which 5102 looms are working in 299 different villages. The main products of the cluster are cotton sarees of tie and dye and small amount of dress materials, lungis and napkins etc. The annual production is around 10 Crores rupees. The products of this area are mostly marketed in Orissa and National market. The cluster so to say represents Orissa in quantitative and qualitative Tie and Dye Cotton Sarees as no other clusters of other districts in Orissa produces such sarees.

… The weaving in the cluster by the traditional weavers’ community popularly known as “Bhulia” came in to existence during mid of 17th  century and with increase in their population, they spread to other nearby places. They initially belong to Rajasthan and were presented during the 14th  century to the ruler of Patna State, a king of Chouhan dynasty “Ramai Deb”. Later on they were presented to the king of Sonepur during the 16th  century and scattered to the nearby district i.e., Bargarh in the next century.

The cluster consists sizable number of professional weavers (Non traditional) from Schedule Caste and  Schedule Tribe (Kuli caste) weavers, which in total accounts for 60 %. Generally these weavers are less skilled and engaged in production of Napkin, Lungi,  Sarees, Dhotis, etc.

Weaving with Tie dye in the cluster prior to 40”s was done with 40”/42” looms operated with hanging slay and engaged in producing Kapta, Lungi and Napkins made of 12’s/16’s/20’s cotton yarn. The yarns were dyed with vegetable colours. The main colours were Yellow (from Turmeric), Maroon (From bark of Aal tree), Blue form Nile and Black (From Hirakasi and Chakda Seeds). Fabrics of vegetable colours were sometimes not fast and ranges of colours were also limited, forcing the Tie-Dye production in to limited colours and so also the design. Such practice was on vogue till the mid of 40s when vat colour was first substituted for in place   of some vegetable colours.

The next major changes in the cluster took place with the introduction of twisted cotton mercerized yarn and synthetic colours in the early 60’s. The looms started widening mainly to 52″ width for normal sarees and other production and 90″ for double bed sheet production. There were also few 60” / 72″ looms to accommodate weaving of middle-sized bed sheets.

Activities in the cluster started taking momentum with the involvement of Late Padmashree Dr. Krutartha Acharya and his four associates in the cluster area during 1942 and started their business with production on limited numbers of looms. Later he converted his business in to a co operative society named Sambalpuri Bastralaya, registered during the year 1954 under “Bihar and Orissa Co operative Societies Act” and established in Bargarh town. This is the first firm in the cluster, which took the leadership in weaving activities of cluster and stood as a milestone in its history.

… Unlike the Tie-Dye work of other states of India, the motif and designs of the cluster are infinite in number and every motif or design is categorized under a special caption. No design is let out without giving it a name. It shows the creative mind of the weavers of the region.

Sonepur cluster: http://www.indianhandloomscluster-dchl.net/Sonepur/Index.asp.

The writing in the stones of Kahandagiri cave Orissa suggests that the art of weaving was in Orissa before 600 B.C. Similarly some carving in the temples of Sonepur cluster (Baidyanath) indicates that weaving was in existence in the area during prior to 9th B.C. Besides weaving with cotton yarn, there was also weaving with wild silk (Tassar), wool and fibers from stem of lotus. The tie-dye weaving in western Orissa came in to existence during mid of 14th century when 100 weaver’s families were brought from Raipur area of Madhya Pradesh by the then ruler of Patnagarh Sri Ramai Dev. The weavers’ later on titled as Meher and their caste known as Bhulia. Such weavers were traditionally weaving the tie and dye fabrics. Orissa has also history of exporting handloom to south-east Asia countries like Thailand, Java, Borrneo and Sumatra (Last three are Island of Indonesia) during pre-independence period in sea route. It is therefore also the bank of river Mahanadi and some other big river of Orissa has developed weaving culture.

The Bomkai Designs are the traditional designs in production in the village named Bomkai in Ganjam District of Orissa. Latter on it is introduced in Sonepur. Before 1950’s the main product mix of this cluster was cotton sari and Dhotis. The main occupation of “Bhulia” community was weavings. Weavers had looms of short width and they used to weave cotton sari of length 12ft and its width was 36 inches. During that period, cotton yarn of (10 to 40) counts were available in the market.

Weavers by own used to sell woven sari at nearby locally market and whatever they got remuneration by selling the sari, they used to brought yarn for further weaving. During this period, due to absence of chemical dyes, mainly vegetable dye was used to dye the yarn. Vegetable dye had limited colours i,e yellow (From Turmeric), Maroon (From bark of Aal trees), Blue (Nile) and black (Hirakasi and Chakda seeds). The colour of vegetable dyes was not fast in the fabrics. The vegetable dye has limited ranges of colour that limit the design of tie & dye fabrics. During mid of 1950’s the late Padamshree Sri Kruthartha Acharya was the up-coming entrepreneur in handloom sector. He was belonging to Bargarh sub-division which was neighbouring district of Sonepur. He had installed 200 looms at Sonepur and established a unit for producing handloom sarees. During mid of 1960’s, lots of modifications were done to upgrade the handloom sector of Sonepur. The widths of looms were widening up to (48 to 50) inches; mercerized yarns of finer quality (60 counts) were introduced. Shri Kruthartha Acharya also introduced chemical dyes. Many weavers were trained to adopt the change. Due to introduction of chemical dye, the ranges of colour shed were increased which helps the weavers to produce variety of design in tie and dye fabrics. Slowly other weavers of the cluster adopted the new technology. Dr Acharya also searched other market by promoting the Sonepur product in other States by participating in exhibition and fair conducted by handloom department, Govt. of India. He also used to purchase the woven sari from weaver and used to supply raw materials and design to them. This helped the weavers to only concentrate on production work instead of marketing the products. Latter on during 1954, Dr. Achaya converted his firm into cooperative society named Sambalpuri Bastrayala Handloom Cooperative Society Ltd, Bargarh, which is at present stand as a leading PWCS of not only the State but also of the country. During mid Seventies G.O.O. initiated a corporation called Orissa Handloom Development Corporation which grew and decayed in two decades and has been liquidated recently. The other major changes taken place in the cluster was introduction of silk yarn in early 1980’s. The body part of silk fabric was woven with silk yarn and Anchal by cotton tie and dye. It took two – three years to develop Jala design which helped the weaver to design the fabric in simple way. This Bomkai design were developed in the late 80’s and introduced in early 1990’s in the cluster. Since then, the permutation and combination of designs involving in tie-dye, Bomkai, Jala etc are practicing in the cluster. Latter on Body design was also developed to make the fabric more attractive and Zari were used to add value to the fabric. Weaver co-operative societies were the major firms operating in the handloom sectors. These societies were large in number during mid of 90’s. The entry of private entrepreneurs and private traders started from 1980’s. Padamshri Chaturbhuj Meher had entered in this sector in early 1980’s and had great contribution in this sector. On the other hand gradual reduce in the Government subsidies, declining support from apex WCS, closure of Handloom Development corporation and mismanagement at the primary wcs level are the main reasons of reduction in the number of active co-operative societies. Unlike the Tie-Dye work in the other part of India, the motif and design of the cluster are infinite in number and every motif or design is characterized under a special caption. No design is let out without giving it a name. It shows the creative mind of the weavers of region. Orissa had 129236 (1951), 119005 (1987) and 92869 (1996) as per the handloom figure census, which shows the continuous decline in the loom position. The total looms in Sonepur district is 7243 (As per the survey conducted by ADT office Sonepur). The product mixes are cotton sari, silk sari and dress material. The total production of the cluster in the Co-Operative Sector is Rs 985.46 lacs.

December 3, 2009 at 9:48 am 1 comment

Information about Subarnapur district handloom cluster

Following information is taken from: http://www.indianhandloomscluster-dchl.net/Doc/Highlight/Hihglights-May.09-SONEPUR.doc.pdf

Total 60 SHGs have been formed – Coverage 720 weavers. Credit linkages done for 11 SHGs for Rs 7.20 lakhs & another 30 individuals got credit of Rs.18.20 Lakhs of 19 bankers meetings.

  • Three Consortiums are formed with 875 weavers. Named Bhulia Master Weavers Association and Jagruti Bunakar Sangh- Sagarpali has been formed consisting of 824 weavers [573 members and 251 members respectively]. They have purchased land for CFC and dye house by their own contributions. These 2 consortiums have formed new association named “Sonepur Bunkar Sangh” and have filed all related documents for registration under Producer Company act.
  • 25 awareness camps – [Coverage of 800 weavers and 45 master weavers].
  • 3139 weavers’ family has been covered under Health insurance Scheme and several have been covered under MGBBY.
  • Through the productions of light weight saris, wages of 10 weavers have been increased by Rs 100 per sari. Wage Increase of Rs 100 per sari for the Cotton and silk Sari weavers in the entire cluster.
  • With the support of WSC, Bhubaneswar and Shri Rajesh Kumar Dash, weight loss of yarn during de-gumming process has been minimized.Weight loss has been decreased by 25 – 30%.
  • Concepts of vegetable dyeing were imparted to the local’s dyers through the training programme and 23 new colour shades has been developed from local flora and vegetations.
  • 10 weavers were imparted training on Jacquards which will enhance their productivity. 204 weavers were trained in different skills like synthetic dyeing, Vegetable dyeing.
  • Total Sales and orders generated: Sales – Rs 76.16. Sales Generated through: CCIC: 0.24 Lakh, Exhibition & BSM -54.12, other buyers’ Order –21.80 Lakhs –Major Buyers are: Balaji Emporium, New Delhi, Nanakchand Gangaram, New Delhi, Pakittu, Kerala, Shri Sankari Pani, Tatanagar.
  • Total 91 Designs developed.22 new designs developed by Shri. Subhankar & Sales & order Generated of Rs.3.45.
  • CFC / Dye House: Construction Completed. Machinery Installed. It will be functional by 15th May 2009 at Sagarpalli.
  • Birmaharjpur: Dye house construction is completed. Quotations are invited. Purchased of machinery will be over by 31st May 2009. MOU is not sign as registration of consortium is in process
  • Fund Utilization
  • 2008-09: Amt sanctioned: Rs 43.39 lakhs, Amt utilized Rs 32.03 lakhs, % utilization 73.81
  • 2007-08: Amt sanctioned: Rs 77.20 lakhs, Amt utilized Rs 69.96 lakhs, % utilization 90.62

December 2, 2009 at 11:48 am 2 comments

New Book- Western Orissa: Past & Present

Thanks to Mr. Tapas Sarangi for the following pictures and information:

From the content it looks like this books gives a nice  overview of Western Orissa. It has separate chapters on  history, heritage, religion, language, culture and art, tourist places, agriculture, education, and industrialization of Western Odisha or Koshal region.

November 18, 2009 at 2:21 pm 1 comment

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