Archive for October, 2012

We will miss you, Sri Nakfudi Panda

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 13, 2012 at 1:08 am 1 comment

Eminent Kosli poet Sri Nakfudi Panda passes away at Sonepur

Following message and graphic are taken from BENI’s FB page:

One of the earliest poets in KOSLI language, Sri Nakfudi Panda passes away today.

PASRI DEBU KAEN NA (Sankha, edited by Mayadhar Mansingh, 1944) was the first published poem of Sri Nakfudi Panda.

A great loss to Kosli literature. May his soul rest in peace!

Late Sri Panda speaking at the Kosal Sahitya Sanskruti Academy, Sonepur

Following is a poem by Sri Nakfudi Panda:

October 12, 2012 at 4:26 am 1 comment

Registered newspapers and magazines published in Kosli language

Following screen-shot is taken from http://rni.nic.in/rni_display_statelang.asp

October 10, 2012 at 6:09 am 1 comment

Jhamujatra: a tribal festival of Lanjigarh

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 9, 2012 at 1:28 pm 1 comment

Temple city, Junagarh, Kalahandi

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 8, 2012 at 12:40 pm 1 comment

Ispat general hospital Rourkela to have a medical college

Following picture is taken from http://www.panoramio.com/photo/33408853:

Following report is from the Sambad:

This blog on IGH contain a lot of pictures and not much information about the hospital: http://ighrkl.blogspot.in/ . But gives an impression about the happenings at  Ispat general hospital Rourkela.

October 7, 2012 at 3:07 am Leave a comment

Harishankar temple remains neglected

Following report is from the Sambad:

October 6, 2012 at 3:07 pm 1 comment

Govt plans two ‘smart’ cities in each state

Following is a report from FE:

New Delhi: Government is planning to develop two ‘smart’ cities with a host of modern features like intelligent transport and carbon neutral status in each of the states in the second phase of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal mission.

“We have an urban renewal mission which means that the central government funds the cities and one of our programmes is that we propose to have two smart cities in every state,” Urban Development minister Kamal Nath told reporters here today.

The minister said medium sized cities with half a million to one million population will be developed as smart cities and expertise of Austrian Institute of Technology had been sought for the purpose.

Nath was speaking after meeting a delegation led by Austrian minister of Transport, Innovation and Technology Doris Bures here.

“Now how do we define these smart cities, what will it cover….right from broadband, intelligent transport to carbon neutral (features), these are so many components…that is what we propose to collaborate with the Austrian Institute of Technology,” he said.

“We want to seek assistance from the Institute on what kind of model smart cities we should look at,” he added.

Nath also said that medium sized cities like Ujjain or Jabalpur would be considered for the proposal to create smart cities.

“We cannot take on very large cities for smart cities at this stage, we must recognise that. We have to take our medium sized ones, so we want to look at cities with half a million population to one million population instead of trying to take on cities with ten million population,” he said.

“We have discussed the possibility of collaboration between the Austrian Institute of Technology and the National Institute of Urban Affairs which comes under the ministry of Urban Development,” Nath said.

“We want to get technologies towards rapid urbanisation which we are going through, which includes smart cities, urban transportation facilities and their integration,” Nath said.

Austrian minister Doris Bures expressed hope for a greater cooperation between the two countries.

Nath was questioned by reporters about reports that a team of officials was being sent to Chile to understand the defects in the airport metro.

“It is not final yet, but there is an idea that it should be seen that if should study such a thing which had happened there. The report in this regard is not ready yet,” Nath said.

October 5, 2012 at 12:42 pm Leave a comment

Why India could remain forever poor: Tavleen Singh on Vedanta, Kalahandi and NGOs

Following report is from Indian express:

If there is one story that contains in it all the reasons why India remains a poor country, it is the story of the Vedanta aluminum refinery in Odisha. Now that economic reforms are back on the government’s agenda, it is a story I hope high officials, high-minded judges and busybody NGOs listen to carefully. Why do I tell it this week? Because earlier this month, Sterlite Industries gave notice that they are closing their Lanjigarh refinery because it is bleeding to death. It has lost Rs 2,500 crores trying to stay alive these past two years. When it closes, 6,500 people will lose their jobs in one of India’s poorest districts.

On a tour of Kalahandi’s villages, during the 1987 drought, I saw poverty so horrific that memories of children dying slowly in barren mud huts remains etched painfully not just in my mind but in my heart. The rains failed that year so the economy based on a single annual crop collapsed and thousands of Adivasi families were forced to live on a diet of birdseed and mango kernels for months. Women started selling babies they could not longer feed.

You would think then, would you not, that if someone was prepared to bring investment to such a desolate place he would be applauded, welcomed with open arms. The very opposite happened and for the wrong reasons. The first people to start protesting against Vedanta were foreigners. Had the refinery functioned on bauxite from the nearby Niyamgiri hills, aluminum could have been produced in Lanjigarh at $1,500 a tonne, instead of the global cost of $2,050. This caused alarm bells to start ringing in the ears of the international aluminum industry and soon powerful foreign NGOs appeared in Kalahandi to stop the project. Greenpeace and Amnesty International are still there supposedly to protect the interests, and sacred hills, of forest-dwelling Adivasi tribes.

The ‘foreign hand’ would not have mattered if the Government of India had not intervened to make the functioning of the refinery impossible in different ways. One of which was to declare that bauxite could not be mined in the Niyamgiri hills. There continues to be confusion about whether this was for environmental reasons or whether it was to protect Adivasis from losing their land. But, once mining was banned, the Orissa Mining Corporation that had signed an agreement with Vedanta to supply it with 150 million tonnes of bauxite, could no longer do so. It has so far been unable to supply an ounce. Vedanta’s environmental, governmental and NGO problems began after an investment of more than Rs 15,000 crores had already been made in the refinery so for two years it functioned on bauxite imported from other states. An unviable situation so the project will now close.

The Adivasis can now go back to living in primitive harmony with nature without schools for their children, without healthcare, without electricity or clean water and without the possibility of ever improving their lives. Will they be happy this way? Only according to urban NGOs who build flourishing businesses on romanticising desperate poverty and a way of life that they themselves could not abide for a single day.

What is interesting about the targeting of Vedanta by such a range of vested interests is that if it were a public sector company, it could have gone ahead and raped the Niyamgiri hills without anyone noticing. It has happened often in the past and continues to happen across the country. So when the Prime Minister sets in motion his new phase of economic reform, he should ask himself why. Could it be because those who would like to see India’s private sector remain the stunted creature it once was would like it to go back to being that way?

Judging from the tirades of NGOs and leftist political parties, this seems to be the case. They want all the country’s natural resources to remain in the hands of the state even if governments lack the money and the technology to exploit them. They appear never to have asked themselves why it is states that are richest in natural resources whose people remain mired in horrible poverty. Sadly they have been able to get away with the rubbish they talk in the name of the poor because the Prime Minister has never explained the need for economic reforms.

If all he can come up with is the kind of speech he made last week about ‘money not growing on trees’, then there is not the smallest chance that the reforms will succeed. The noise made by those who are either economically illiterate or have a vested interest in India remaining a poor country forever is too loud and the mood of negativity they have created too deep. The lies they have told are widely believed.

Follow Tavleen on Twitter @ tavleen_singh

October 4, 2012 at 1:04 pm 1 comment

Silent soccer revolution taking place in Sambalpur football academy

Following report is from the Hindu:

Boys undergoing a training session at the Sambalpur Football Academy

Tucked away some 15 km from the bustling western Odisha town of Sambalpur a dream has taken shape in the form of the Sambalpur Football Academy (SFA). And the vision has begun to make an impact in the life of youth in the State. The Academy, established on a sprawling 18-acre property very close to the Hirakud Dam , is complete with three full-sized playfields, a state-of-the-art gymnasium, accommodation for nearly 100 boys of different age groups, a dining hall, a well-equipped kitchen, class rooms, a three-storied guest house, swimming pool and a well-stocked store room. Apart from learning the nuances of the game, the boys are given compulsory education in a Government-affiliated school.

Having come into existence on November 22, 2008, the SFA has made a marked difference to soccer in the State. Two of the leading clubs of Cuttack have based their teams on the SFA boys. More are eyeing talent from this academy.

The SFA, an initiative of former minister, player and a soccer lover Jaynarayan Mishra, is run on self-finance and donations. The MLA of the area for the third successive term, Mishra’s project is contributing to the development of tribal welfare. As much as 90 per cent of the boys are tribals of the State. The rest of the trainees are from Jharkhand, West Bengal, Assam and even Manipur.

Top-class players

The teaching staff is all from the region which helps the boys and the faculty to interact better. Apart from well-qualified coaches, headed by technical director Sanmoy Basu, the academy has a doctor, a dietician and administrative staff to run the programme smoothly.

“We spend close to Rs 1.5 crore per year on the project. The biggest problem we face is lack of exposure to our boys against better teams. We are planning to send our boys to Kolkata to play in local league,” Mishra says.

After organising a football festival for schools in the area, the academy coaches fan out to other States to choose boys for the academy. At present, there are 25 boys in the under-14 group, 24 in U-16, 20 in U-19 and 20 more senior boys.

Pritam Singh is presently in the National under-17 camp in Goa. Sayed Viju Oasim, Golak Pradhan and Prakash Naik were part of the group of Indian boys trained at Arsenal and A.C. Milan academies. The best boys play for Samaleswari FC, owned by the academy.

“The main objective is to produce top-class players through promotion of the game at the grass-root level. In less than four years we have successfully created the right atmosphere in and around the district and the State,” the chairman of the SFA points out. “We need to tie-up with an I-League side. The rest will fall in place.”

The SFA is indeed the beginning of a silent soccer revolution.

sabanayakan.s@thehindu.co.in

October 3, 2012 at 5:16 am 2 comments

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